WHAT’S YOUR HEARING AID LIFE?

If you struggle with hearing loss and have taken the next step with hearing aids, you may feel as if you got your life back. Using hearing aids can require a period of adjustment, however. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Don’t be disheartened if it takes a little while to become accustomed to your hearing aids, and remember: your audiologist is there to help! If you are confused as to how to care for your hearing devices or need to talk through any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out.

I got new hearing aids. Now what?
The first thing you may notice is better hearing! You will probably notice you no longer have to struggle to communicate, which is the goal. Though there can be an adjustment period, the reason you got hearing devices is to correct your hearing and improve your quality of life.

When deciding on which hearing aids are right for you, consider the professional guidance of your audiologist or doctors, and learn the differences of all the models available.

When preparing for a hearing aid purchase, there are several things you can do:

  • Look for a local audiologist you can trust: ask friends or family for recommendations or read reviews.
  • Do a preliminary hearing assessment with your audiologist.
  • Take a hearing test online.
  • Shop several models that might fit your needs.
  • Find out what your purchase includes. Are you buying just the devices, or does the retailer throw in a maintenance package or insurance coverage?
  • Once the purchase is complete, have the retailer or audiologist adjust them to fit your ears and your hearing needs.
  • Tell everybody! Your friends and family will celebrate with you and will know they can communicate with you normally!
  • Be sure to learn all the features of your hearing devices, from connections with phone apps to help with listening to music or television through your hearing aids. You are paying for those features, so you should use them!

Once You Have Hearing Aids

Give yourself grace: it will take a short while to adjust to your hearing aids. It may feel weird to have something in your ear, or you may experience sound a little differently than you are used to, but soon you will be hearing normally.

Within the first couple of weeks, you may start to notice sounds that were inaudible before becoming clear and you will begin to pick out specific sounds that you didn’t hear before. These everyday noises can sound unusually loud as your ears start to learn how the devices translate sound.

The physical sensation of having devices in your ears may also take a period of adjustment. Background noises may sound different or new and may be more difficult to filter out at first, but you will get used to that as well.

How Can I Make My Adjustment Easier?

Adjusting to hearing aids takes time, so be gentle with yourself as you gradually experience your new sensations of sound. If it seems like too much, limit your use of them at home and only for a few hours a day at first, then gradually familiarize yourself with the outside world and social interactions. If you are patient, you should soon experience improved hearing capabilities and your ideal sound experience.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

WHAT ARE MY HEARING LOSS RISK FACTORS?

What are the risk factors for developing hearing loss? 

A risk factor is something that increases your odds of developing an ailment, issue or illness.

There are a few risk factors that commonly contribute to hearing loss, but there are other less common ones as well. The more of these risk factors you have the better your chances of developing hearing loss. Decreasing the risk factors will also decrease the likelihood you will suffer from hearing loss. 

Hearing Loss Risk Factors

Low Birth Weight

Premature birth and low birth weight are risk factors for hearing damage. Additionally, complications at birth like asphyxia and jaundice may increase the risk of hearing loss later in life. 

Genetic Conditions

Usher Syndrome, Otosclerosis and other genetic abnormalities can increase the risk for hearing loss. Also, conditions that change the structure or shape of the head and face are also risk factors.

Getting Older

Living our lives always results in some weathering of our whole bodies, including our ears. Age-related hearing damage (presbycusis) can be hereditary and progresses gradually. 

Noise 

Exposure to loud noise is the most common risk factor for hearing loss. It may be from a longer, repeated exposure over time (such as in a factory) or a short burst of very loud noise (like a gunshot). To prevent noise-related hearing loss, remember to bring ear protection like earplugs to lessen any injury. If you know you will repeatedly be exposed to loud noise, consider investing in custom ear plugs. 

Ototoxicity

Some medications, including NSAID drugs, certain types of antibiotics and chemotherapy can damage hearing temporarily or permanently. For example, high doses of aspirin can cause ringing in the ears or even temporary hearing damage in some people. When these medications are stopped the symptoms most often wane. Chemicals in agricultural or factory settings may also be ototoxic (causing hearing damage). Ototoxic chemicals can also be found in cigarettes. 

Diseases and Illnesses

Health issues like Meniere’s disease can affect inner ear fluid and lead to hearing damage. Tumors, vascular disease, diabetes and autoimmune disorders may similarly affect hearing health. Injury to the head or other trauma can also cause hearing loss. 

Medical Treatments

Aside from antibiotic medications and chemotherapy, radiation therapy can weaken hearing health, specifically when the radiation is focused in proximity to ears. 

The likelihood for hearing loss can increase with exposure to any of these influences, but it does not guarantee it. This is not an all-inclusive list, and if you try to decrease the known risk factors of hearing damage, you will be considerably less likely to develop hearing loss. 

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget. 

WHAT ARE THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF HEARING LOSS?

Hearing loss is an annoyance and can hinder a person’s social life and even effect productivity at work, but did you know that there can be other health implications associated with hearing loss?

Young Children and Babies with Hearing Loss

Hearing damage in infants and young children can be the most influential in a person’s life because it can hinder development during crucial years of growth. Inability to hear (or hear well) during these formative years can also go undetected until much of the damage has already been done.

Infants now undergo routine hearing screening soon after birth and at certain milestones to ensure their language, learning and social development is not hindered unnecessarily.

If hearing loss is not detected as early as possible, a child may miss key learning and communication development milestones that can affect his or her self-esteem, language skills and lifelong communication abilities.

Adults with Hearing Loss

The more common hearing loss occurs well into adulthood, as we age. This hearing loss won’t affect our development, but could lead to further health complications, including mental and social health issues.

Immediate effects of hearing loss can include headaches, fatigue, mental strain, muscle tension, high blood pressure and increased stress.

The effort it takes to communicate well when hearing is harder than it used to be can lead to social isolation and depression. Eventually lower mental stimulation may result which can lead to cognitive decline such as dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Hearing Loss as a Symptom

Hearing loss can not only cause other medical and health issues, it can also be a result of other health problems that may or may not have been yet detected.

These health problems that can affect hearing loss include heart disease, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, obesity, diabetes, and other chronic illness. Acute illnesses such as respiratory or ear infections can also affect hearing in the short term.

Medications can also cause short-term hearing loss as well, but will usually reverse when the medication is stopped. Medications that affect hearing are called ototoxic medications.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

SHOULD YOU GET A HEARING AID?

When is the last time you had a hearing evaluation?

Hearing loss among American adults is a commonplace occurrence, but according to recent surveys, only about one fifth of those who experience hearing damage take any action to remedy it.

You may think that hearing loss is irreversible: and you are right. But there is something you can do to halt the progression of hearing loss and often restore normal hearing, but you can’t do that until you have a diagnosis.

How can I be sure I have hearing loss?

A quick trip to your physician or audiologist with a fast, painless hearing assessment will give you all the information you need to know your level of hearing loss and the best way to remedy it.

For most people with hearing loss, hearing aids are an effective way to restore hearing and all that accompanies it: social time with friends, enjoyment of entertainment, family gatherings and normal communication.

Don’t waste a moment.

American adults with hearing loss wait an average of 7-10 years before seeking medical intervention, and that’s a shame, because the earlier hearing loss is detected, the less damage that may be done.

The cost of hearing aids is often a deterrent: they are expensive and most often not covered by medical plans. When you think of them as an investment, however: not only in your life and your health now, but for your future, you may realize they are well-worth the expense.

Here are a few reasons you should consider investing in hearing aids.

General health can be improved with hearing aids.

A host of other physical ailments have been linked with hearing loss, from heart disease to cognitive decline and dementia. In this case, keeping abreast of your hearing health could quite literally save your life.

Hearing loss has been shown to cause other issues as well, including social isolation and anxiety in public settings. This can lead to anger, anxiety and depression, creating a cycle that keeps the affected person alone and in the dark.

Cognitive decline has also been strongly linked to hearing loss, which causes decreased brain stimulation. Balance problems can also result, as an imbalance in inner ear fluids may also be a cause of the hearing damage.  

Emotional well-being and social life improve with hearing aids.

Hearing loss can have a big impact on friendships and lead to more misunderstandings.  Easy, healthy communication is key to lasting friendships, so those suffering with hearing loss may become socially isolated as a result as well.

Get your relationships back by restoring communication with your friends and family.

Having hearing loss leads to trouble navigating the world on your own, making a hearing loss sufferer more dependent on others. This dependence can lead to feelings of depression because they feel out of control of their own lives.

Get your independence back and get your life back by getting your hearing back!

Increase professional success with restored hearing.

Improved professional success can also result from the restoration of normal hearing with hearing aids.

Difficulty communicating in a work environment can result in reduced job performance and even demotions or decreases in pay.

Any cognitive decline can make your job even more difficult because it becomes harder to learn new things. When you take this into consideration, not investing in hearing aids could in fact cost you money overall!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

DEBUNKING THE MYTHS OF HEARING LOSS

Hearing loss is an incredibly common disability, but it is one that is invisible. That makes understanding it or accommodating to people who suffer with hearing loss a bit more difficult. There is also a stigma attached to hearing loss (and the need for hearing aids): so much so, that only about 20% of people who could benefit from hearing aids actually use them. Additionally, people suffering from hearing loss wait an average of 10 years before addressing it with hearing aids or other intervention.

Hearing aids are expensive and usually not covered by medical plans, so that is one reason that hearing loss sufferers shy away from them. Another reason is that they are afraid they will be ugly or obvious to others, or they may be afraid to admit there is a problem.

There are a few misconceptions about hearing loss, however, that will be helpful to address so you can better understand the challenges and navigate to solutions.

Misconceptions About Hearing Loss

1.    Hearing loss only affects older people.

Though hearing loss is more common in the elderly, hearing loss affects people of all ages and can be caused by a variety of factors, including birth complications. Most commonly, hearing loss is a result of loud noise exposure, which can come from a loud work environment, or even listening to music too loudly.

2.    Hearing aids are an instant fix.

Hearing aids are a tool that help the brain recognize and interpret sound. If a person has vision problems, putting on a pair of glasses can often immediately restore sight. With hearing aids it’s a little bit more complicated. Once the right hearing aids are chosen, the audiologist may need to do a bit of adjustment before the best hearing experience is achieved.

3.    Talking louder can help deaf people to hear you.

Often people think that hearing loss is just like the volume is turned down on a person’s hearing, but that isn’t exactly the case. For someone suffering from hearing loss, it is as if you are speaking into a broken microphone: the sound is distorted no matter what the volume. Speaking louder will usually not help.

4.    Hearing loss can be reversed with surgery or medicine.

As of now, permanent hearing loss is unfortunately irreversible by any method. This makes it all the more crucial to protect your hearing and prevent hearing loss in the first place. Annual hearing screenings can catch hearing loss long before you notice it yourself—so that is another important way to intervene before hearing loss begins to interfere with your life.

5.    Deaf people only listen when they want to.

If a person with hearing loss seems like they are ignoring you, it may just be because they really didn’t hear you! Also, people who struggle with hearing loss also struggle with listening fatigue because they have to concentrate to understand sounds that are effortless for other people. When listening fatigue sets in, they may need to take a break.

6.    Deaf people are good lip readers

Lip reading is hard! Depending on how long a person has been deaf, they may or may not be very good at lip reading. Even the best lip readers are playing a guessing game, so help them out by augmenting your speech with as much body language and gesturing as possible!

7.    Sign language is the same everywhere.

Many people don’t know it, but there are about 130 different sign languages, and different spoken languages and countries have their own versions of sign language!

8.    Deaf people can’t drive automobiles.

Deaf people can drive too! They do need to be much more cautious of their surroundings and pay very close attention visually to what is happening around them.

9.    Deafness is hereditary.

Hearing loss and deafness come from a wide variety of factors, including childhood illness, accidents, loud noise exposure, congenital defects or ototoxic medication/chemicals. Deafness is rarely genetic.

10. Hearing aids are big and ugly with unsightly wires.

Modern hearing aids are much smaller than ever before and can even be controlled by your smartphone. Many of them are so tiny they fit deep into the ear canal and are virtually invisible! They also come in all shapes, sizes and colors and can be wireless.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

HOW SHOULD YOU CLEAN YOUR EARS?

You may have heard from your audiologist or another professional that using cotton swabs to clean your ears can damage your ear drum. It’s true: injuries from the use of cotton swabs are common. Some of the problems that can occur include hurting delicate inner ear areas, puncturing the ear drum, and possibly even vertigo or deafness!

If you’re like most people, you may be wondering if cotton swabs are dangerous, what can be used to clean dirt, build-up, or wax from the ears?

Ear wax is normal.

Ear wax is actually a good thing. It’s a sign of healthy ear function. If you think about it, our ears are holes in our head that could potentially expose us to unwanted bacteria or dust. The ears make wax to trap these harmful elements and prevent them from going further into our heads.

Our ears produce ear wax as a defense mechanism, so ear wax is a critical way to keep us healthy and safe. Assuming your ears don’t overproduce wax, you may not need to clean them at all. Talking, chewing and other jaw movement normally helps ear wax to migrate down the ear canal and out of the ears.

Impaction

On rare occasion, someone will have an overproduction of ear wax. In this case, it is possible for the ear wax to accumulate and cause impaction. Impaction is just a buildup that can block one or more functions of the ear, one of which is a problem with hearing.

Impaction may have accompanying symptoms such as tinnitus (ringing in the ear), an earache, dizziness, odor coming from the ear, or a cough.

If you often have something in your ear, such as ear plugs, which may prevent the ear wax from escaping the ear, you may also experience impaction as a result. In other cases, an oddly-shaped ear canal could also have an effect on the migration of ear wax naturally.

What’s the best way to get rid of ear wax?

You can verify whether or not you have ear wax impaction with an examination by your doctor or audiologist. Once the condition of your ears is established, a course of action can be recommended.

Doctors can clean your ears in the office to remove impacted ear wax if necessary and can give you tips for the best ways to remove clean your ears at home.

Other ways to clean your ears that don’t use cotton swabs:

    • A Moist Wash Cloth Wipe ear with a warm washcloth to remove wax in your outer ear. This prevents pushing ear wax deep into the ear, which can happen with a cotton swab.
    • Try an Ear Wax Softener Drug stores often stock over-the-counter wax-softening ear drops. Ingredients in these drops may include peroxide, saline, mineral oil, glycerin, or baby oil.
  • Irrigation A syringe can be used irrigate ears with a saline solution. The syringe rinses the ear canal gently, and is often more effective if an ear wax softener is first used.

Some people still wish to use cotton swabs, so if this is you: use them to clean only the outer part of the ear canal. Avoid deep insertion and always use a gentle, circular motion .

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

DID YOU KNOW HEARING AIDS COULD HELP PROTECT YOUR MIND?

Do you suffer from hearing loss? Have you been putting off the decision to get hearing aids? Or maybe you think they are unnecessary.

Hearing aids have been shown to halt the progression of hearing loss. Since hearing loss is almost always irreversible, it’s best to stop it at the earliest stage possible.

And now, a new long-term study has shown that wearing hearing aids can also stop cognitive decline that is related to hearing loss. It makes sense: if hearing aids prevent the progression of hearing loss, and hearing loss leads to cognitive decline, then it follows that using hearing aids can help to prevent cognitive decline!

The study, which was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, compared cognitive decline in adults with hearing loss that did not use hearing aids and compared it to the cognitive decline of adults with hearing loss that do use hearing aids. There was also a control group: adults without measurable hearing loss.

The results were remarkable: there was no difference found in the rates of cognitive decline between people without hearing loss and those with hearing loss that used hearing aids.

In contrast, the adults with hearing loss that did not use hearing aids and in which their hearing loss went otherwise untreated showed significantly lower scores on the Mimni-Mental State Examination (a well-known assessment of cognitive function). This study was conducted over a period of 25 years, and the results are independent of any other factors, including education, age, or gender.

Adults with hearing loss that use hearing aids report improved communication, which then result in improved mood, more social interactions and increased cognitive stimulating abilities.

The brain-helping technologies of today’s hearing aids assist the brain in remaining active and engaged in the elderly, which combats cognitive decline. The “brain-first” focus that researchers and doctors have adopted will work to further these technologies and help people remain active, healthy and happy well into retirement years.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

YOUR HEARING HEALTH: WORTH THE INVESTMENT

Hearing loss is a fairly common phenomenon among American adults, yet only about 20% of those suffering from hearing damage are using any type of hearing aid.

Hearing aids are not cheap: they are an investment in not only your life now, but your life in the future as well. Hearing aids are often not covered by insurance plans or government assistance and can cost several thousand dollars. But before you shrug off hearing aids and tell yourself you don’t really need them, consider a few things.

Hearing Devices Are Shown to Improve General Health

Hearing loss has been linked to other physical maladies such as heart disease. So paying attention to your hearing health could literally save your life.

Besides being linked to disease, hearing decline can cause other factors, like social isolation and anxiety when trying to communicate with others, which can lead to depression and anger.

Hearing loss is also strongly linked to cognitive decline, probably because of the decrease in stimuli to the brain. Hearing loss, which may be caused by an imbalance in inner ear fluids, can also be linked to issues with balance, causing falls and injury.

Hearing Devices Are Shown to Improve Emotional Well-Being

Hearing loss may affect interpersonal relationships. Communicating and understanding others can become a struggle, and those with hearing loss may become socially isolated as a result.

When you get your hearing back, you get your relationships back.

When a person has hearing loss, they can have more trouble navigating the world on their own, making them more dependent on others. This dependence can lead to feelings to depression because they feel out of control of their own lives.

When you get your hearing back, you get your independence back. You get your life back.

Hearing Devices Can Improve Quality of Life

You may think that hearing loss is a minor inconvenience that you can overcome on your own. But hearing loss can lead to more difficult communication, which can affect relationships.

When getting a hearing aid for the first time, those who had been struggling with hearing loss quickly find an increase in areas of their lives they didn’t expect, such as their sense of humor, sense of safety, self-confidence, physical health, work relationships and romantic relationships.

Still think hearing aids aren’t worth the investment?

Hearing Devices Can Increase Professional Success

If all these benefits aren’t enough, people struggling with hearing loss that invest in hearing aids also see improved professional success.

When communication is difficult overall, it is even more difficult in a work environment. This can result in reduced job performance and even a drop in pay.

And since hearing loss can also influence cognitive decline, making new things harder to learn, this can make your job even more difficult.

In fact, not investing in hearing aids may actually cost you money overall if it affects your job performance!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

HEARING RESOLUTIONS FOR 2019

With a new year comes a time to reflect on our old patterns and how to update our habits and improve ourselves. Do you typically make New Year’s Resolutions, and what is your track record at sticking to them?

Personally, I don’t make New Year’s Resolutions. I educate myself throughout the year and when I see changes that need to be made, I don’t wait for a new year to make them. Even so, I have been reflective on my habits and patterns this new year, thinking about things that I might like to change.

We all value our hearing. From conversing with friends and family to watching TV or listening to music, we use hearing almost continuously. Hearing health is something we take for granted, but when we begin to experience hearing loss we realize what a gift our hearing health has always been.

Fortunately, there are ways we can protect our hearing. Here are a few easy things you can do right now to ensure your hearing health lasts as long as possible.

1.    Yearly hearing screenings are key. One of the easiest things you can do to protect your hearing is to get annual hearing evaluations at your audiologist. Since hearing damage is irreversible, it’s important to catch it early: even before you notice it. Hearing screenings are quick, easy, and often covered by insurance.

2.    Wear protective gear. Since the most common type of hearing damage is noise-induced hearing loss, it is important to protect your ears whenever you are in a noisy environment. Whether you are at work in a factory, at a firework show, or at a concert, be sure to protect your ears from loud noises. It’s a good idea to always carry earplugs. You never know when you will be in a noisy environment, so it’s good to be prepared.

3.    Keep the volume low. When we listen to music or watch TV on mobile devices using ear buds, it’s easy to have the volume at a level above 80 decibels, which is the threshold for hearing damage. It’s best to keep the volume at less than 60% of the maximum, and if you can use over-the-ear earphones with noise-canceling technology, that can prevent you from needing to turn the volume up as loud to hear your device.  

4.    Get custom-made. If you listen to a lot of music or if music is your business, it’s a good idea to get custom-made earplugs or earphone molds. They are relatively inexpensive and a great way to protect your hearing from noise-induced hearing loss. They are customized to fit your ear canal exactly. Not only do they deliver superior sound, they allow for better quality listening, so you can listen at a lower volume and prevent hearing damage.

The first step to halting hearing loss and preventing further damage is to recognize your situation. Come in today for a hearing screening and formulate a strategy to train your brain to listen actively and effectively.

NOISE POLLUTION AND HEARING HEALTH

There is noise pollution everywhere we go: there are even “noise-cancelling” features in our earbuds and headphones that filter out background noises for us. If we are exposed to unwanted noises for too long, it can be very irritating. No matter what the noise pollution: airplanes overhead or traffic from a nearby road, a dog barking or a lawnmower in a neighbor’s yard– noise pollution is ubiquitous.

Filtering Noise Pollution

With all of the noise surrounding us, it’s no wonder we have different ways to filter it. Our “noise filters” help us block unwanted noise and hear the sounds we do want to hear. Noise pollution is all of the unwanted sound.

Noise pollution can be made up of every-day sounds, and even some of the sounds we want to hear can pose a risk to hearing health. Stereo systems at concerts, movie theaters, sporting events, or even home speakers or ear buds can expose your ears to sounds so loud they can damage your hearing. We like to attend social gatherings and places like bars, concerts, or fireworks shows, but they can increase risk of hearing damage the most.

Hearing Damage

Noise-induced hearing loss can be caused by exposure to noises over 80 decibels. This hearing loss can be temporary or permanent. Loud, short bursts of noises, like a gunshot or an airplane overhead, can hurt our ears and can cause hearing damage right away.

Even everyday noises we don’t think much about can affect our hearing health. Examples of these noises are lawnmowers (about 90 decibels) and vacuum cleaners (about 70 decibels) By comparison, a normal conversation may be about 60 decibels.

Noise pollution can actually affect our entire bodies. A loud noise such as a bang can disturb digestion, alter your heartbeat and disrupt breathing patterns. Constant exposure to a loud noise can cause crankiness and make it difficult to sleep. Noise can even impact your blood pressure.

After attending a very noisy event like a fireworks show, you may experience a ringing sound in your ears. This ringing is tinnitus, and it can last just a few minutes or even a few days. Permanent hearing loss can result if there are several episodes of tinnitus. Age related hearing loss is due in part to this cumulative effect of hearing damage over a lifetime.

Be Proactive

Fortunately, we can be pro-active to prevent hearing damage by protecting ourselves from noise pollution. This will help to make sure we maintain good hearing even into our older years. Limiting exposure to loud noises is of course one of the best ways to prevent hearing loss. There are a lot of noises we control, like our own stereo systems when we watch movies or listen to music at home. When you are on the go, you can still listen to music but make a switch to over-the-ear headphones instead of earbuds, which are more likely to damage hearing.

When we have plans to attend a very loud event, do your best to avoid the noisiest spots, or even bring ear plugs. If there are loud noises outside such as construction work or a lawnmower, close the windows until the noise subsides.

Noise-canceling headphones allow us to enjoy music at lower volumes, without having to compete with the noises outside of the headphones. That can help to protect hearing for the future as well.

By taking small, easy steps to protect your hearing on a daily basis, you can work to prevent hearing damage as you get older.

If you suspect hearing loss, whatever the cause, visit your audiologist to take action. You may find a resolution that can inhibit or stop the development of hearing damage.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.