BALANCE AND HEARING HEALTH

Did you know the way your body balances is connected with hearing health?

Balance disorders such as Vertigo are fairly common. Vertigo is typically temporary episode of imbalance or dizziness. Most people have heard that it is related to your inner ear, but do you know how?

Our bodies are oriented and balanced through the vestibular system, which allows us to stay upright without falling. Our inner ears and our eyes are sensory systems that support the body’s equilibrium and orientation. They translate and connect what is going on around us with our brains.  

The fluids in our inner ears are affected by hearing loss and also by sicknesses such as upper respiratory infections. These fluids control our sense of balance. This is why balance issues can result from hearing loss.

Balance issues can cause all kinds of problems, from increasing the risk of injury from falling, to embarrassment in public.

So how can you decrease your risk of vertigo and other balance problems?

1.    Pay attention to how your medications make you feel. If you always feel dizzy or very lethargic when taking a certain medication, talk to you doctor about other options.

2.    Get annual hearing exams. This is the best way to measure any hearing loss that has already occurred and make a plan to prevent further damage.

3.    If you need hearing aids, get them! They are an investment into not only your hearing, but your balance, your social life and your enjoyment of entertainment!

4.    Move every day. Daily exercise, such as regular walks or going to the gym are so important! Not only will these activities increase circulation and improve balance, it helps to regulate other bodily fluids like inner ear fluid too.

5.    Check your eyes too. When you get your yearly check-up, get a vision check. Poor vision can also increase the risk of balance issues.

Every part of our bodies are connected, and each part influences the others. Your overall health is impacted by your hearing health, so take care of it!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

DO I HAVE TINNITUS?

Have you ever heard a ringing in your ears? If so, you have experienced tinnitus. Tinnitus can be annoying, inconvenient, or even painful for the many people who suffer from it. Interestingly, some people never really notice symptoms of tinnitus, even though they are experiencing it. Recent research indicates that people have varying experiences of tinnitus, and these symptoms originate in the brain, not the ears.

A study done at the University of Illinois found that the brains of people with tinnitus hear sounds differently than those who don’t have tinnitus. Even among tinnitus sufferers, there are differences the way peoples’ brains process sound.  

What Exactly is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is actually just a symptom (not a disorder or disease). There are a lot of different causes of tinnitus, like noise exposure or use of ototoxic medications (medications that cause hearing loss). Approximately 25 million people across America are affected by tinnitus. There is no cure for tinnitus, and it is often temporary. It’s important to understand how to manage it and lessen its effects, or if possible, prevent it entirely.

Tinnitus Can be Affected by Your Feelings

Recent studies have found that the brain’s blood oxygen levels can change when exposed to different types of noise. Researchers discovered differences in the way tinnitus sufferer’s brains processed sound compared with non-tinnitus sufferers. “Good” sounds, like laughter, were presented, along with “neutral” and “unpleasant” sounds.

The Brain and Emotions

People with tinnitus engage with sounds differently in their brains, which can trigger emotion. Not so with people without tinnitus. The study also found that tinnitus sufferers who complain the most process emotional noise in different parts of the brain than the people who did not think the symptoms were bothersome.

This can explain why some people are very bothered by tinnitus, and others are not. This shows that the symptoms distress some people more than others.

Insomnia. irritability, depression, mood swings, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts have been reportedly caused by tinnitus. Some people merely report it as a minor irritant or even say it doesn’t trouble them at all. The people who are less bothered by tinnitus generally process emotion in the brain’s frontal lobe, while others process emotions in the brain’s amygdala.

Treatment Options for Tinnitus

This study helps explain why tinnitus is more bothersome to some people and not others. It may also help scientists to come up with more effective treatments that can target the cause of this suffering.

Hearing loss and tinnitus are often connected. If you begin to experience tinnitus symptoms a trip to your audiologist is a good idea, and may help to prevent hearing loss. Hearing aids can also be an option for those who suffer from hearing loss or tinnitus.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

WHAT ARE INVISIBLE HEARING AIDS?

When deciding to get hearing aids for the first time, many people list their top concern is how they look, and what people will think of them when they notice the hearing aids.

The stigma attached to having hearing aids can be a big deterrent to getting them at all.

If you could get all of the benefits of hearing aids: better communication, easier hearing, noise cancelling…and the hearing aids themselves were invisible, would that change your perspective?  

Well, now this is not just a daydream. Invisible hearing aids have become a reality, and they are helping more people than ever improve their hearing without the self-consciousness and stigma attached to using hearing aids.

Invisible-in-the-canal (IIC) hearing aids are now available and once inserted, are practically invisible to everyone.

The Benefits of IIC Hearing Aids:

They’re invisible. IICs are so tiny that once inserted in the ear canal, they are not noticeable or visible. Because they are so small, they fit deep into the ear canal and most people will not be able to see them. If the stigma of hearing aids has been stopping you from getting them, IICs could be right for you.

They’re comfortable. Because IICs fit so snugly deep within the ear canal, they don’t trap sound and cause an echoing called the occulusion effect like larger hearing aids can. Sounds are more natural, less hollow, less distorted.

They preserve battery life. The power output for IICs is lower than other hearing aids because they sit so close to the ear drum. This proximity to the ear drum also effectively prevents feedback, especially when talking on the phone. 

The sound quality is superior. Natural sound quality is another benefit of IICs. It sits so deep in your ear canal that it is can leverage the natural acoustics of your ear to funnel sound, giving it a more natural tone as a result.  There are no tubes or wires, so there is nothing to block the sound. An easier adjustment to using hearing aids has been reported, as well as better localization of sound.

IICs do have some drawbacks, however, which should weigh into the decision you make.

The Drawbacks of IIC Hearing Aids:

They only have one microphone. Most hearing aids are larger, so they can support multiple microphones, which allows for advanced directionality (the ability to focus on a sound in a certain direction and reduce background noise in that direction). Because IICs are so tiny, they can only support one microphone and therefore cannot offer the same directionality.

They preserve energy, but can only support very small batteries. The small size of IICs can only support a smaller battery that is depleted more rapidly than the larger batteries of other devices. The battery will therefore require more frequent charging.

IICs cannot accommodate severe hearing loss. People with mild to moderate hearing loss will benefit most from IICs. The small size can only offer limited capabilities.

IICs don’t fit some people’s ears. Occasionally IICs don’t work for people because of the shape of their ears. People with short ear canals or that are small or of an irregular shape may not be able to use IICs.

While IIC hearing devices are a marvel of modern technology and can be the perfect solution for some, especially people with mild to moderate hearing loss who are worried about bulky hearing aids, they are not right for everyone. Consult with your audiologist to weigh the pros and cons before deciding one way or the other.  

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

WHAT’S YOUR HEARING AID LIFE?

If you struggle with hearing loss and have taken the next step with hearing aids, you may feel as if you got your life back. Using hearing aids can require a period of adjustment, however. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Don’t be disheartened if it takes a little while to become accustomed to your hearing aids, and remember: your audiologist is there to help! If you are confused as to how to care for your hearing devices or need to talk through any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out.

I got new hearing aids. Now what?
The first thing you may notice is better hearing! You will probably notice you no longer have to struggle to communicate, which is the goal. Though there can be an adjustment period, the reason you got hearing devices is to correct your hearing and improve your quality of life.

When deciding on which hearing aids are right for you, consider the professional guidance of your audiologist or doctors, and learn the differences of all the models available.

When preparing for a hearing aid purchase, there are several things you can do:

  • Look for a local audiologist you can trust: ask friends or family for recommendations or read reviews.
  • Do a preliminary hearing assessment with your audiologist.
  • Take a hearing test online.
  • Shop several models that might fit your needs.
  • Find out what your purchase includes. Are you buying just the devices, or does the retailer throw in a maintenance package or insurance coverage?
  • Once the purchase is complete, have the retailer or audiologist adjust them to fit your ears and your hearing needs.
  • Tell everybody! Your friends and family will celebrate with you and will know they can communicate with you normally!
  • Be sure to learn all the features of your hearing devices, from connections with phone apps to help with listening to music or television through your hearing aids. You are paying for those features, so you should use them!

Once You Have Hearing Aids

Give yourself grace: it will take a short while to adjust to your hearing aids. It may feel weird to have something in your ear, or you may experience sound a little differently than you are used to, but soon you will be hearing normally.

Within the first couple of weeks, you may start to notice sounds that were inaudible before becoming clear and you will begin to pick out specific sounds that you didn’t hear before. These everyday noises can sound unusually loud as your ears start to learn how the devices translate sound.

The physical sensation of having devices in your ears may also take a period of adjustment. Background noises may sound different or new and may be more difficult to filter out at first, but you will get used to that as well.

How Can I Make My Adjustment Easier?

Adjusting to hearing aids takes time, so be gentle with yourself as you gradually experience your new sensations of sound. If it seems like too much, limit your use of them at home and only for a few hours a day at first, then gradually familiarize yourself with the outside world and social interactions. If you are patient, you should soon experience improved hearing capabilities and your ideal sound experience.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

WHAT ARE THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF HEARING LOSS?

Hearing loss is an annoyance and can hinder a person’s social life and even effect productivity at work, but did you know that there can be other health implications associated with hearing loss?

Young Children and Babies with Hearing Loss

Hearing damage in infants and young children can be the most influential in a person’s life because it can hinder development during crucial years of growth. Inability to hear (or hear well) during these formative years can also go undetected until much of the damage has already been done.

Infants now undergo routine hearing screening soon after birth and at certain milestones to ensure their language, learning and social development is not hindered unnecessarily.

If hearing loss is not detected as early as possible, a child may miss key learning and communication development milestones that can affect his or her self-esteem, language skills and lifelong communication abilities.

Adults with Hearing Loss

The more common hearing loss occurs well into adulthood, as we age. This hearing loss won’t affect our development, but could lead to further health complications, including mental and social health issues.

Immediate effects of hearing loss can include headaches, fatigue, mental strain, muscle tension, high blood pressure and increased stress.

The effort it takes to communicate well when hearing is harder than it used to be can lead to social isolation and depression. Eventually lower mental stimulation may result which can lead to cognitive decline such as dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Hearing Loss as a Symptom

Hearing loss can not only cause other medical and health issues, it can also be a result of other health problems that may or may not have been yet detected.

These health problems that can affect hearing loss include heart disease, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, obesity, diabetes, and other chronic illness. Acute illnesses such as respiratory or ear infections can also affect hearing in the short term.

Medications can also cause short-term hearing loss as well, but will usually reverse when the medication is stopped. Medications that affect hearing are called ototoxic medications.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

COMMON CAUSES OF HEARING PROBLEMS: HOW TO SPOT THEM

Often we think of hearing loss as an issue that starts in adulthood and only affects adults. While hearing loss affects the elderly the most, it is something that can affect every age and that can begin as early as birth or as an infant.

Ear infections are a common childhood ailment within the first months or years of life, because the immune system and ear canal are still developing and fluids can more easily become trapped in the ear canal causing infection. As long as ear infections are resolved quickly, there is usually no lasting damage, but if they go on for too long, or they are too frequent, sometimes hearing issues can result.

The overwhelming majority of hearing loss does occur in the elderly, however, and can get worse as we age unless we do something about it. This is why yearly hearing screenings at your doctor’s or audiologist’s office are so important. The earlier hearing loss is caught, the earlier your doctor can intervene and halt the progression.

Here are the most common types of hearing loss, how you can recognize them and what you can do about it.

Congenital Hearing Loss
As the name indicates, congenital hearing loss affects hearing from birth, and will affect the sufferer throughout his or her lifetime.

Congenital hearing loss is often passed down from other members of the family who are impacted by it, or it can happen due to complications during labor and delivery as an infant.

Other genetic syndromes can also affect hearing, including Down Syndrome, Treacher Collins, and Usher Syndromes. Sickness of the mother during pregnancy, such as herpes, rubella, toxoplasmosis, cytomegolavirus or German measles can also result in a congenital hearing defect for the child she is carrying.

Otitis Media
Otitis Media is the most common type of hearing loss and it involves inflammation of the middle ear, which can result in a gradual build-up of fluid in the ear that sometimes leads to a viral infection we call an “ear infection.”

Most ear infections occur in children under 7 years old. The child will complain of ear pain or discomfort, and babies may pull at their ears. A mild fever, irritability and crying may be other indications an ear infection is present.

Hearing loss due to otitis media is almost always temporary, as it is due to the build-up of fluid in the ear, which will usually drain as the infection is resolved.

Damaged Ear Drum
The ear drum is a very thin membrane separating the middle ear from the inner ear, and it is surprisingly easy to damage it with a very loud noise or even with a cotton swab.

Fortunately, a damaged eardrum usually heals without any intervention. The rate of healing can depend on the cleanliness and health of the ear (more moisture in the ear can cause it to heal more slowly).

In the most ideal conditions, fully healing a damaged eardrum may take several weeks.

Swimmer’s Ear
Swimmer’s ear is a build-up of water or moisture in the ear, which causes the inner ear to become irritated and swollen. Surprisingly, Swimmer’s Ear is not always caused by swimming: it can happen for any reason. Very rainy, foggy or humid weather can sometimes cause this buildup of moisture in the ear canal and lead to Swimmer’s Ear as well.

Swimmer’s Ear can also happen over time, so if you are feeling it get worse, see your doctor or audiologist to help you clear the excess moisture, because cotton swabs probably won’t work.

Glue Ear
Glue ear is a condition in which sticky, thick residue builds up in the middle section of the ear and blocks normal hearing. To the sufferer, it may feel like something has been pushed into the ear just out of reach.

Glue ear can go away on its own, but it does not always resolve itself. It can be challenging if a young child has it because babies and toddlers lack the words to express what is bothering them, so it may be difficult to diagnose.

Because it causes a temporary hearing loss, glue ear can also interfere with development during these formative years if it is not resolved or treated.

Excessive Ear Wax
While glue ear is more common among children, excessive ear wax build-up is more common among adults. Excessive ear wax will rarely lead to any other health issues, but it may require drops that help to thin out the ear wax so it can be expelled by the body.

If you frequently experience excessive ear wax, you may want to explore alternative options for cleaning your ears, such as a syringe that can remove ear wax build up.

Otitis Externa
Otitis externa is similar to otitis media as it is an infection in the outer part of the ear, instead of the middle part. Otitis externa is most often caused by exposure to a bacteria from polluted waters, like in a polluted lake or swimming hole.

Symptoms of otitis externa may include irritation, pain and itching of the outer section of the ear, and the tissue may become swollen.

Fortunately, otitis externa is easily treated: often it resolves on its own, or more severe cases can be treated with antibiotics.

Ototoxic Medications
Sometimes medications or exposure to certain chemicals can cause temporary or even permanent hearing loss. The type of medication that can affect hearing are called ototoxic medications.

Many types of medication can affect hearing loss short-term, most commonly NSAIDs such as ibuprofen, acetaminophen or aspirin. These hearing issues usually resolve when the medication is stopped. Some antibiotics can also cause permanent hearing loss, and for that reason they are only used in life-threatening situations.

Acquired Hearing Loss
And finally, the type of hearing loss we most often think of is acquired hearing loss, which can result from severe or frequent exposure to loud noises. Continually listening to very loud music or other loud noise, or even a noisy work environment can contribute to noise-induced hearing loss over time.

Other causes of acquired hearing loss are chronic untreated ear infections, meningitis, whooping cough, damaged ear drum, chicken pox, measles, mumps, and even a bad case of the flu. The good news for these types of hearing loss is that they are most often temporary and will resolve themselves with the infection.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

TROUBLESHOOTING HEARING AID ISSUES

Millions of Americans suffer from hearing loss in America, and hearing aids are a great option for not only helping all of those people to hear better, but to prevent further hearing loss. Since hearing loss is not reversible, hearing aids are an important treatment option that can contribute to better mental health and social life as well.

If you already own hearing aids, you know that good ones are an investment, and you probably do your best to take care of them and protect that investment.

There are many common hearing aid issues that are easily fixed at home, so before you take them in, try these steps to see if the issue you are experiencing can be resolved without an expensive professional repair.

These tips may also help prevent you from having to go without your hearing aids for any length of time while you take them to get repaired.

The most common hearing aid problems are:

  • A distorted or unusual sound—nothing sounds normal
  • They are producing feedback or “whistling”
  • They are not loud enough
  • No sound is being produced

Try these simple steps for each issue. If these steps don’t work, it may be time to take them in for repair.

Try these simple steps for each issue. If these steps don’t work, it may be time to take them in for repair.

  1. A distorted or unusual sound

Check your batteries for corrosion—they may need to be replaced. If there is corrosion on the battery contacts, you can try to clean them by opening and closing the battery compartment several times or bringing them into your hearing center to be cleaned.

It’s possible the memory or program got changed inadvertently. Re-set the program and see if that helps.

If you suspect your hearing aids are damaged, take them into your hearing center for inspection.

  1. They are producing feedback or “whistling”

If the hearing aids are making a whistling or distorted sound, they are most commonly not inserted correctly. Try removing them and re-inserting them snugly in your ear.

Try turning down the volume. If the whistling sound subsides, you may have an improper fit—this can be adjusted at your hearing care provider. This can sometimes happen if you have lost a lot of weight recently.

It’s possible your ear canals are blocked with earwax. If you think this is the case, you may need to come in to have your ears thoroughly cleaned.

  1. They are not loud enough

First adjust the volume and check the response.

Then visually examine your hearing aids to see if there is anything physically blocking the microphone input: it could be earwax, dust or something else.

If your hearing aid contains a tube, inspect that for any flaws, like cracks, moisture inside, or a blockage. Your hearing center should be able to help you replace tubing fairly quickly and easily.

It’s possible the program got switched, so change to a new program to see if that changes anything.

When is the last time you went in for a hearing evaluation? It’s possible your hearing has declined since your last check, so a hearing screening may be in order. While you are in the office, they can check your hearing aid for any issues and do diagnostics to make sure they are in full working order.

  1. No sound is being produced

Repeat the steps from above, ensuring there are no broken parts, blockages or breakage that you can see. Your hearing aids may need to be cleaned.

Is it possible your battery needs to be replaced? If it was replaced recently, ensure the battery door is closed securely. Also ensure the battery is not inserted backwards.

If none of these troubleshooting tips work, it’s possible your hearing aids are damaged. Come in so we can take a look.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

SHOULD YOU GET A HEARING AID?

When is the last time you had a hearing evaluation?

Hearing loss among American adults is a commonplace occurrence, but according to recent surveys, only about one fifth of those who experience hearing damage take any action to remedy it.

You may think that hearing loss is irreversible: and you are right. But there is something you can do to halt the progression of hearing loss and often restore normal hearing, but you can’t do that until you have a diagnosis.

How can I be sure I have hearing loss?

A quick trip to your physician or audiologist with a fast, painless hearing assessment will give you all the information you need to know your level of hearing loss and the best way to remedy it.

For most people with hearing loss, hearing aids are an effective way to restore hearing and all that accompanies it: social time with friends, enjoyment of entertainment, family gatherings and normal communication.

Don’t waste a moment.

American adults with hearing loss wait an average of 7-10 years before seeking medical intervention, and that’s a shame, because the earlier hearing loss is detected, the less damage that may be done.

The cost of hearing aids is often a deterrent: they are expensive and most often not covered by medical plans. When you think of them as an investment, however: not only in your life and your health now, but for your future, you may realize they are well-worth the expense.

Here are a few reasons you should consider investing in hearing aids.

General health can be improved with hearing aids.

A host of other physical ailments have been linked with hearing loss, from heart disease to cognitive decline and dementia. In this case, keeping abreast of your hearing health could quite literally save your life.

Hearing loss has been shown to cause other issues as well, including social isolation and anxiety in public settings. This can lead to anger, anxiety and depression, creating a cycle that keeps the affected person alone and in the dark.

Cognitive decline has also been strongly linked to hearing loss, which causes decreased brain stimulation. Balance problems can also result, as an imbalance in inner ear fluids may also be a cause of the hearing damage.  

Emotional well-being and social life improve with hearing aids.

Hearing loss can have a big impact on friendships and lead to more misunderstandings.  Easy, healthy communication is key to lasting friendships, so those suffering with hearing loss may become socially isolated as a result as well.

Get your relationships back by restoring communication with your friends and family.

Having hearing loss leads to trouble navigating the world on your own, making a hearing loss sufferer more dependent on others. This dependence can lead to feelings of depression because they feel out of control of their own lives.

Get your independence back and get your life back by getting your hearing back!

Increase professional success with restored hearing.

Improved professional success can also result from the restoration of normal hearing with hearing aids.

Difficulty communicating in a work environment can result in reduced job performance and even demotions or decreases in pay.

Any cognitive decline can make your job even more difficult because it becomes harder to learn new things. When you take this into consideration, not investing in hearing aids could in fact cost you money overall!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

DEBUNKING THE MYTHS OF HEARING LOSS

Hearing loss is an incredibly common disability, but it is one that is invisible. That makes understanding it or accommodating to people who suffer with hearing loss a bit more difficult. There is also a stigma attached to hearing loss (and the need for hearing aids): so much so, that only about 20% of people who could benefit from hearing aids actually use them. Additionally, people suffering from hearing loss wait an average of 10 years before addressing it with hearing aids or other intervention.

Hearing aids are expensive and usually not covered by medical plans, so that is one reason that hearing loss sufferers shy away from them. Another reason is that they are afraid they will be ugly or obvious to others, or they may be afraid to admit there is a problem.

There are a few misconceptions about hearing loss, however, that will be helpful to address so you can better understand the challenges and navigate to solutions.

Misconceptions About Hearing Loss

1.    Hearing loss only affects older people.

Though hearing loss is more common in the elderly, hearing loss affects people of all ages and can be caused by a variety of factors, including birth complications. Most commonly, hearing loss is a result of loud noise exposure, which can come from a loud work environment, or even listening to music too loudly.

2.    Hearing aids are an instant fix.

Hearing aids are a tool that help the brain recognize and interpret sound. If a person has vision problems, putting on a pair of glasses can often immediately restore sight. With hearing aids it’s a little bit more complicated. Once the right hearing aids are chosen, the audiologist may need to do a bit of adjustment before the best hearing experience is achieved.

3.    Talking louder can help deaf people to hear you.

Often people think that hearing loss is just like the volume is turned down on a person’s hearing, but that isn’t exactly the case. For someone suffering from hearing loss, it is as if you are speaking into a broken microphone: the sound is distorted no matter what the volume. Speaking louder will usually not help.

4.    Hearing loss can be reversed with surgery or medicine.

As of now, permanent hearing loss is unfortunately irreversible by any method. This makes it all the more crucial to protect your hearing and prevent hearing loss in the first place. Annual hearing screenings can catch hearing loss long before you notice it yourself—so that is another important way to intervene before hearing loss begins to interfere with your life.

5.    Deaf people only listen when they want to.

If a person with hearing loss seems like they are ignoring you, it may just be because they really didn’t hear you! Also, people who struggle with hearing loss also struggle with listening fatigue because they have to concentrate to understand sounds that are effortless for other people. When listening fatigue sets in, they may need to take a break.

6.    Deaf people are good lip readers

Lip reading is hard! Depending on how long a person has been deaf, they may or may not be very good at lip reading. Even the best lip readers are playing a guessing game, so help them out by augmenting your speech with as much body language and gesturing as possible!

7.    Sign language is the same everywhere.

Many people don’t know it, but there are about 130 different sign languages, and different spoken languages and countries have their own versions of sign language!

8.    Deaf people can’t drive automobiles.

Deaf people can drive too! They do need to be much more cautious of their surroundings and pay very close attention visually to what is happening around them.

9.    Deafness is hereditary.

Hearing loss and deafness come from a wide variety of factors, including childhood illness, accidents, loud noise exposure, congenital defects or ototoxic medication/chemicals. Deafness is rarely genetic.

10. Hearing aids are big and ugly with unsightly wires.

Modern hearing aids are much smaller than ever before and can even be controlled by your smartphone. Many of them are so tiny they fit deep into the ear canal and are virtually invisible! They also come in all shapes, sizes and colors and can be wireless.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

DID YOU KNOW HEARING AIDS COULD HELP PROTECT YOUR MIND?

Do you suffer from hearing loss? Have you been putting off the decision to get hearing aids? Or maybe you think they are unnecessary.

Hearing aids have been shown to halt the progression of hearing loss. Since hearing loss is almost always irreversible, it’s best to stop it at the earliest stage possible.

And now, a new long-term study has shown that wearing hearing aids can also stop cognitive decline that is related to hearing loss. It makes sense: if hearing aids prevent the progression of hearing loss, and hearing loss leads to cognitive decline, then it follows that using hearing aids can help to prevent cognitive decline!

The study, which was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, compared cognitive decline in adults with hearing loss that did not use hearing aids and compared it to the cognitive decline of adults with hearing loss that do use hearing aids. There was also a control group: adults without measurable hearing loss.

The results were remarkable: there was no difference found in the rates of cognitive decline between people without hearing loss and those with hearing loss that used hearing aids.

In contrast, the adults with hearing loss that did not use hearing aids and in which their hearing loss went otherwise untreated showed significantly lower scores on the Mimni-Mental State Examination (a well-known assessment of cognitive function). This study was conducted over a period of 25 years, and the results are independent of any other factors, including education, age, or gender.

Adults with hearing loss that use hearing aids report improved communication, which then result in improved mood, more social interactions and increased cognitive stimulating abilities.

The brain-helping technologies of today’s hearing aids assist the brain in remaining active and engaged in the elderly, which combats cognitive decline. The “brain-first” focus that researchers and doctors have adopted will work to further these technologies and help people remain active, healthy and happy well into retirement years.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com