BALANCE AND HEARING HEALTH

Did you know the way your body balances is connected with hearing health?

Balance disorders such as Vertigo are fairly common. Vertigo is typically temporary episode of imbalance or dizziness. Most people have heard that it is related to your inner ear, but do you know how?

Our bodies are oriented and balanced through the vestibular system, which allows us to stay upright without falling. Our inner ears and our eyes are sensory systems that support the body’s equilibrium and orientation. They translate and connect what is going on around us with our brains.  

The fluids in our inner ears are affected by hearing loss and also by sicknesses such as upper respiratory infections. These fluids control our sense of balance. This is why balance issues can result from hearing loss.

Balance issues can cause all kinds of problems, from increasing the risk of injury from falling, to embarrassment in public.

So how can you decrease your risk of vertigo and other balance problems?

1.    Pay attention to how your medications make you feel. If you always feel dizzy or very lethargic when taking a certain medication, talk to you doctor about other options.

2.    Get annual hearing exams. This is the best way to measure any hearing loss that has already occurred and make a plan to prevent further damage.

3.    If you need hearing aids, get them! They are an investment into not only your hearing, but your balance, your social life and your enjoyment of entertainment!

4.    Move every day. Daily exercise, such as regular walks or going to the gym are so important! Not only will these activities increase circulation and improve balance, it helps to regulate other bodily fluids like inner ear fluid too.

5.    Check your eyes too. When you get your yearly check-up, get a vision check. Poor vision can also increase the risk of balance issues.

Every part of our bodies are connected, and each part influences the others. Your overall health is impacted by your hearing health, so take care of it!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

THE CONNECTION BETWEEN HEARING LOSS AND EAR INFECTIONS

If your child has had ear infections, you understand how frightening they are. Intense pain along with concern for permanent hearing loss.

Hearing damage can be the result of an ear infection, but it is uncommon: ear infection-related hearing loss will almost always go away when the infection does.

Ear infections are not all the same, and can have different causes. While all ear infections can cause temporary hearing loss, the type of infection most associated with hearing loss is a middle ear infection.

Swimmer’s Ear is a type of outer ear infection that is most often caused by water getting trapped in the ear canal. This can give you the feeling that your head is in a box and cause sounds to be distorted or muted. Removing the fluid will usually resolve this type of ear infection quickly. Tilt your head or lay down on the affected side will often allow the water to run out on its own. Over-the-counter swimmer’s ear drops are also available at drug stores, and will also help to remove the moisture quickly and easily.  

Acute otitis media is a middle ear infection. These infections are painful and include ear canal inflammation. Fluid can sometimes build up behind the eardrum and result in temporary hearing loss on the affected side. This is a physical hearing loss, because the pent-up fluid is simply blocking the sound from entering the eardrum.  

Middle ear infections are commonly treated full hearing is reestablished after the infection is healed.

The Causes of Middle Ear Infections

Upper respiratory infections such as the common cold can prompt a middle ear infection. There is then inflammation and swelling in the Eustachian tube (which connects the middle ear with the throat). When there is inflammation in the Eustachian tube, it can’t balance pressure in the middle ear, and pain along with temporary hearing loss result.

Why Don’t Adults Get Ear Infections and Children Do?

Middle ear infections are more common in children than adults because children’s Eustachian tubes are less developed, making it more difficult for excess fluid to drain during an infection. A less-developed immune system in children can also contribute to the increased frequency of all kinds of infection.  

Ear Infection Symptoms

Small children and infants cannot express clearly the type of pain they are experiencing, or the exact location of pain. Here are some ways to recognize if your child has an ear infection:

  • Not responding to sounds or voices
  • Pulling at their ears
  • Fluids draining from the ear
  • An elevated temperature
  • Crankiness

Even in adults and older children an ear infection may be difficult to recognize. Here are some symptoms:

  • Ear pressure
  • A muted or blocked feeling, causing difficulty understanding speech
  • Feeling dizzy or off-balance
  • Pain in or around the ear
  • Vomiting or nausea

If your child gets recurring ear infections, it is possible for permanent hearing loss to occur. Visit your audiologist to weight the options.  

Ear Infection Treatment

Ear infections usually resolve themselves within a few days. Keep your child or yourself comfortable and treat with liquids and rest.

Check your child’s hearing often to catch any hearing loss as early you can, because permanent hearing loss is irreversible. To schedule an appointment for a quick, easy hearing evaluation, contact us today!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

DO I HAVE TINNITUS?

Have you ever heard a ringing in your ears? If so, you have experienced tinnitus. Tinnitus can be annoying, inconvenient, or even painful for the many people who suffer from it. Interestingly, some people never really notice symptoms of tinnitus, even though they are experiencing it. Recent research indicates that people have varying experiences of tinnitus, and these symptoms originate in the brain, not the ears.

A study done at the University of Illinois found that the brains of people with tinnitus hear sounds differently than those who don’t have tinnitus. Even among tinnitus sufferers, there are differences the way peoples’ brains process sound.  

What Exactly is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is actually just a symptom (not a disorder or disease). There are a lot of different causes of tinnitus, like noise exposure or use of ototoxic medications (medications that cause hearing loss). Approximately 25 million people across America are affected by tinnitus. There is no cure for tinnitus, and it is often temporary. It’s important to understand how to manage it and lessen its effects, or if possible, prevent it entirely.

Tinnitus Can be Affected by Your Feelings

Recent studies have found that the brain’s blood oxygen levels can change when exposed to different types of noise. Researchers discovered differences in the way tinnitus sufferer’s brains processed sound compared with non-tinnitus sufferers. “Good” sounds, like laughter, were presented, along with “neutral” and “unpleasant” sounds.

The Brain and Emotions

People with tinnitus engage with sounds differently in their brains, which can trigger emotion. Not so with people without tinnitus. The study also found that tinnitus sufferers who complain the most process emotional noise in different parts of the brain than the people who did not think the symptoms were bothersome.

This can explain why some people are very bothered by tinnitus, and others are not. This shows that the symptoms distress some people more than others.

Insomnia. irritability, depression, mood swings, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts have been reportedly caused by tinnitus. Some people merely report it as a minor irritant or even say it doesn’t trouble them at all. The people who are less bothered by tinnitus generally process emotion in the brain’s frontal lobe, while others process emotions in the brain’s amygdala.

Treatment Options for Tinnitus

This study helps explain why tinnitus is more bothersome to some people and not others. It may also help scientists to come up with more effective treatments that can target the cause of this suffering.

Hearing loss and tinnitus are often connected. If you begin to experience tinnitus symptoms a trip to your audiologist is a good idea, and may help to prevent hearing loss. Hearing aids can also be an option for those who suffer from hearing loss or tinnitus.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

WHAT ARE INVISIBLE HEARING AIDS?

When deciding to get hearing aids for the first time, many people list their top concern is how they look, and what people will think of them when they notice the hearing aids.

The stigma attached to having hearing aids can be a big deterrent to getting them at all.

If you could get all of the benefits of hearing aids: better communication, easier hearing, noise cancelling…and the hearing aids themselves were invisible, would that change your perspective?  

Well, now this is not just a daydream. Invisible hearing aids have become a reality, and they are helping more people than ever improve their hearing without the self-consciousness and stigma attached to using hearing aids.

Invisible-in-the-canal (IIC) hearing aids are now available and once inserted, are practically invisible to everyone.

The Benefits of IIC Hearing Aids:

They’re invisible. IICs are so tiny that once inserted in the ear canal, they are not noticeable or visible. Because they are so small, they fit deep into the ear canal and most people will not be able to see them. If the stigma of hearing aids has been stopping you from getting them, IICs could be right for you.

They’re comfortable. Because IICs fit so snugly deep within the ear canal, they don’t trap sound and cause an echoing called the occulusion effect like larger hearing aids can. Sounds are more natural, less hollow, less distorted.

They preserve battery life. The power output for IICs is lower than other hearing aids because they sit so close to the ear drum. This proximity to the ear drum also effectively prevents feedback, especially when talking on the phone. 

The sound quality is superior. Natural sound quality is another benefit of IICs. It sits so deep in your ear canal that it is can leverage the natural acoustics of your ear to funnel sound, giving it a more natural tone as a result.  There are no tubes or wires, so there is nothing to block the sound. An easier adjustment to using hearing aids has been reported, as well as better localization of sound.

IICs do have some drawbacks, however, which should weigh into the decision you make.

The Drawbacks of IIC Hearing Aids:

They only have one microphone. Most hearing aids are larger, so they can support multiple microphones, which allows for advanced directionality (the ability to focus on a sound in a certain direction and reduce background noise in that direction). Because IICs are so tiny, they can only support one microphone and therefore cannot offer the same directionality.

They preserve energy, but can only support very small batteries. The small size of IICs can only support a smaller battery that is depleted more rapidly than the larger batteries of other devices. The battery will therefore require more frequent charging.

IICs cannot accommodate severe hearing loss. People with mild to moderate hearing loss will benefit most from IICs. The small size can only offer limited capabilities.

IICs don’t fit some people’s ears. Occasionally IICs don’t work for people because of the shape of their ears. People with short ear canals or that are small or of an irregular shape may not be able to use IICs.

While IIC hearing devices are a marvel of modern technology and can be the perfect solution for some, especially people with mild to moderate hearing loss who are worried about bulky hearing aids, they are not right for everyone. Consult with your audiologist to weigh the pros and cons before deciding one way or the other.  

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

PROTECT YOUR HEARING

Since permanent hearing loss is irreversible, it is very important to slow and prevent hearing damage any way we can. Here are a few tips to help you protect your hearing now and prevent hearing loss in the future.

1.    Reduce the Volume

Entertainment is everywhere: music follows us with our earbuds, we watch TV at home and listen to the radio in the car on the way to the movie theater, restaurant or ball game.

The World Health Organization found that over 1 billion teens and young adults in the world are at risk for noise-induced hearing loss as a result of audio devices.

If you enjoy listening to music or other entertainment through earbuds, protect your hearing by following the 60/60 rule: listen with headphones or earbuds no more than 60 minutes per day at no more than 60% volume. 

Over-the-ear headphones are also recommended instead of ear buds, because they expose the ear drum to less direct sound waves.

2.    Use Ear Protection

Noise in our environments like concerts, sporting events, a factory work setting, lawnmowers and other loud tools can contribute to noise-induced hearing loss, even if we are only occasionally exposed.

Approximately 15% of adults in the U.S. have hearing loss that is a result of environmental noise.

One very easy way to protect you hearing and prevent hearing loss is to carry earplugs. Earplugs are inexpensive, compact, and very helpful in preserving hearing. They can be purchased cheaply at almost any local drug or grocery store. Musicians and others that need special features can purchase custom earplugs that allow them to hear conversations and music while still limiting exposure to loud noise, for example. Ask your audiologist if custom ear plugs may be right for you.

3.    Recovery Time After Exposure

If you are in a particularly loud environment, like a concert or club, try to take 5 minutes to step away from the noise several times to allow your ears to rest.

Also, our ears need at least 16 hours of quiet to recover from a loud night out.

4.    No Need for Cotton Swabs

 Cotton swabs are both unnecessary and not recommended for cleaning the ears. Ear wax serves an important function in protecting our ear canals. Our ears are self-cleaning, and wax helps to prevent dirt, dust and bacteria from entering the ear canal and reaching our brains. Inserting anything too far into the ear jeopardies the sensitive ear drum, so don’t risk it.  

If you have excess wax, try cleaning your ears with a damp towel or with an earwax softening solution. If you think you have an overproduction of wax, ask your audiologist if anything else should be done.

5.    Avoid NSAIDs Whenever Possible

Over the counter anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDS, such as ibuprofen, aspirin and naproxen can cause hearing loss. This is called ototoxicity. It is often temporary but over time can become permanent, so take these medicines sparingly.

6.    Cut Out Stress

Tinnitus (ringing in the ears) can be triggered by high levels of stress. Anxiety and stress are well-known to limit blood circulation. In addition, it tenses up the body and puts pressure on the nerves. Take some time today and every day to relax. Think about the things for which you are grateful: thankfulness is a confirmed stress relief!

7.    Get Moving!

Exercise that that gets your heart pumping improves circulation to your whole body, including your ears. Any movement counts: walking, running or riding a bike are all great. Blood and oxygen flow are vital to the inner parts of the ear and help your hearing to function optimally.

8.    Dry is Best

Infections such as swimmer’s ear can be caused by moisture trapped in the ear canal. Infections can affect hearing ability either temporarily or even permanently. Gently dry your ears with a towel after bathing or swimming. If moisture can still be felt in your ears, lay down on the affected side or tilt your head and pull gently on your ear lobe to allow the water to come out naturally.

Ear plugs designed specifically for swimming are also great to prevent water from getting trapped in the ear canal. Ensure the ear plugs fit well, or moisture can still seep in and get stuck in your ear canal. If you do a lot of swimming, it’s a good idea to ask your audiologist about swimming ear plugs.

9.    Annual Screenings

Annual hearing exams are vital to hearing health. Hearing loss happens progressively, and often is overlooked until it has developed significantly. With regular screenings, you can catch hearing damage before you notice it yourself to prevent further loss.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

TRAINING YOUR HEARING: A MARATHON, NOT A SPRINT

If you have hearing loss, it’s a good idea to take positive steps to avoid further hearing damage. Here are five “workouts” to help strengthen your hearing skills.

Regular Exercise

Staying active all day long will help to keep blood circulating, which provides benefits to all areas of your body, including your ears.

Even light exercise is great, just as long as you do some of it every day. You can jog, cycle, or walk. Even stretching exercises like yoga and Pilates can qualify. And if you do a lot of gardening or housework—you know that can get your heart pumping as well!

Just remember, if you exercise to the tune of music, try to keep the volume low, especially when using ear buds. Noise-induced hearing loss is the most common type, and music is a repeat offender.

Stretching

Did you know that deep breathing and stretching exercises like in yoga can also help improve hearing?

We hear all the time that yoga has a lot of health benefits, and it can strengthen hearing by increasing blood flow to your ears, among other areas. Deep breathing and stretching are a light exertion and count as exercise!  

Where there is increased blood flow your body can also detoxify effectively, which can improve nerve function. All of these factors are positive and can help maintain healthy hearing.

Puzzles and Games

If I asked you which organ plays the biggest role in your hearing, you might say your ears, but you would be wrong! Your brain is the powerhouse when it comes to hearing and listening comprehension. Your ears are like sound funnels: they carry the sound in, but your brain translates and makes those sounds understandable to you. Therefore whatever you do to exercise your brain will positively impact your hearing skills too.

The brain needs exercise just as much as the rest of your body does! Games, riddles and puzzles like crossword puzzles, Sudoku and word searches are not only fun, they also serve as brain exercises which combats atrophy. Atrophy is known as demntia when it begins to not only affect your hearing but your mental capacity and reasoning abilities.

Pretty much any game counts here: social games like poker, bingo and hearts are a workout for your brain while being a fun activity with friends.

Practice Focus

You can find hearing exercises online or from your audiologist as well. These exercises are meant to improve your hearing capabilities and give you good practice at distinguishing sounds.

Here’s an exercise to try that can help you focus and train your hearing in an environment with a lot of distracting background noise:

Turn your TV or radio on so you can hear it clearly. Next turn on music or another competing noise. Have someone else walk around the room you are in, reading sentences from newspaper or a book. With your eyes closed, repeat the sentences back, and picture where they are in the room. This exercise in concentration can help you a lot with focus in an environment with a lot of background noise.  

Concentrate

Here’s one more exercise that you can do when you are alone almost anywhere. If you are at a park or a restaurant or anywhere else, close your eyes and open your ears. Pick out the noises around you. Recognize the sound and pinpoint its location. This exercise will help you to interpret sounds and focus in environments where there is a lot of background noise.  

Your physician or audiologist will be happy to do annual hearing evaluations with you to detect changes in hearing ability much more quickly than you could notice it yourself. The earlier hearing loss is detected the better. Devices and exercises can work to stop the progression of hearing damage so it doesn’t worsen.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

WHAT’S YOUR HEARING AID LIFE?

If you struggle with hearing loss and have taken the next step with hearing aids, you may feel as if you got your life back. Using hearing aids can require a period of adjustment, however. Here are a few things to keep in mind.

Don’t be disheartened if it takes a little while to become accustomed to your hearing aids, and remember: your audiologist is there to help! If you are confused as to how to care for your hearing devices or need to talk through any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out.

I got new hearing aids. Now what?
The first thing you may notice is better hearing! You will probably notice you no longer have to struggle to communicate, which is the goal. Though there can be an adjustment period, the reason you got hearing devices is to correct your hearing and improve your quality of life.

When deciding on which hearing aids are right for you, consider the professional guidance of your audiologist or doctors, and learn the differences of all the models available.

When preparing for a hearing aid purchase, there are several things you can do:

  • Look for a local audiologist you can trust: ask friends or family for recommendations or read reviews.
  • Do a preliminary hearing assessment with your audiologist.
  • Take a hearing test online.
  • Shop several models that might fit your needs.
  • Find out what your purchase includes. Are you buying just the devices, or does the retailer throw in a maintenance package or insurance coverage?
  • Once the purchase is complete, have the retailer or audiologist adjust them to fit your ears and your hearing needs.
  • Tell everybody! Your friends and family will celebrate with you and will know they can communicate with you normally!
  • Be sure to learn all the features of your hearing devices, from connections with phone apps to help with listening to music or television through your hearing aids. You are paying for those features, so you should use them!

Once You Have Hearing Aids

Give yourself grace: it will take a short while to adjust to your hearing aids. It may feel weird to have something in your ear, or you may experience sound a little differently than you are used to, but soon you will be hearing normally.

Within the first couple of weeks, you may start to notice sounds that were inaudible before becoming clear and you will begin to pick out specific sounds that you didn’t hear before. These everyday noises can sound unusually loud as your ears start to learn how the devices translate sound.

The physical sensation of having devices in your ears may also take a period of adjustment. Background noises may sound different or new and may be more difficult to filter out at first, but you will get used to that as well.

How Can I Make My Adjustment Easier?

Adjusting to hearing aids takes time, so be gentle with yourself as you gradually experience your new sensations of sound. If it seems like too much, limit your use of them at home and only for a few hours a day at first, then gradually familiarize yourself with the outside world and social interactions. If you are patient, you should soon experience improved hearing capabilities and your ideal sound experience.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

WHAT ARE MY HEARING LOSS RISK FACTORS?

What are the risk factors for developing hearing loss? 

A risk factor is something that increases your odds of developing an ailment, issue or illness.

There are a few risk factors that commonly contribute to hearing loss, but there are other less common ones as well. The more of these risk factors you have the better your chances of developing hearing loss. Decreasing the risk factors will also decrease the likelihood you will suffer from hearing loss. 

Hearing Loss Risk Factors

Low Birth Weight

Premature birth and low birth weight are risk factors for hearing damage. Additionally, complications at birth like asphyxia and jaundice may increase the risk of hearing loss later in life. 

Genetic Conditions

Usher Syndrome, Otosclerosis and other genetic abnormalities can increase the risk for hearing loss. Also, conditions that change the structure or shape of the head and face are also risk factors.

Getting Older

Living our lives always results in some weathering of our whole bodies, including our ears. Age-related hearing damage (presbycusis) can be hereditary and progresses gradually. 

Noise 

Exposure to loud noise is the most common risk factor for hearing loss. It may be from a longer, repeated exposure over time (such as in a factory) or a short burst of very loud noise (like a gunshot). To prevent noise-related hearing loss, remember to bring ear protection like earplugs to lessen any injury. If you know you will repeatedly be exposed to loud noise, consider investing in custom ear plugs. 

Ototoxicity

Some medications, including NSAID drugs, certain types of antibiotics and chemotherapy can damage hearing temporarily or permanently. For example, high doses of aspirin can cause ringing in the ears or even temporary hearing damage in some people. When these medications are stopped the symptoms most often wane. Chemicals in agricultural or factory settings may also be ototoxic (causing hearing damage). Ototoxic chemicals can also be found in cigarettes. 

Diseases and Illnesses

Health issues like Meniere’s disease can affect inner ear fluid and lead to hearing damage. Tumors, vascular disease, diabetes and autoimmune disorders may similarly affect hearing health. Injury to the head or other trauma can also cause hearing loss. 

Medical Treatments

Aside from antibiotic medications and chemotherapy, radiation therapy can weaken hearing health, specifically when the radiation is focused in proximity to ears. 

The likelihood for hearing loss can increase with exposure to any of these influences, but it does not guarantee it. This is not an all-inclusive list, and if you try to decrease the known risk factors of hearing damage, you will be considerably less likely to develop hearing loss. 

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget. 

TRY THESE TIPS TO AVOID SWIMMER’S EAR

Summer is almost here! It’s time for trips to the beach and sunny days spent in the pool. Swimming in the pool can be a lot of fun, but it what isn’t fun is swimmer’s ear.

Did you know that swimmer’s ear is actually an ear infection caused by bacteria breeding in the ear canal when there is trapped moisture? The best way to deal with Swimmer’s Ear is to avoid it altogether. Here are a few ways to do that.

Don’t let water get trapped in your ears! Since swimmer’s ear is a result of trapped moisture, if you keep your ears clean and dry there is no way for the bacteria to thrive. After water gets in your ears from swimming or another activity, thoroughly dry your ears. You can use towel to dry the outer ear canal, and a hair dryer on the cool setting can help you dry the unreachable parts. Some people use rubbing alcohol to dry out their ears, but frequent use of rubbing alcohol can actually cause more infection later on.

Use swimming ear plugs. To prevent moisture from entering your ears at all, use swimming ear plugs. They can be purchased online, at some retail outlets, or your audiologist’s office. The most important thing is that they fit your ears well, otherwise they may do more harm than good—and don’t use just any earplugs. They should be designed for swimming.  

Use over-the-counter ear drops. You may have used ear drops in the past to help remove unwanted water or moisture after swimming. Over-the-counter ear drops can be a great way to facilitate drying out the ear canal. Other effective things to use are white vinegar, rubbing alcohol, olive oil and hydrogen peroxide. Rubbing alcohol can cause excessive dryness with repeated use and hydrogen peroxide can kill good bacteria in your ear canal and, so use those sparingly.

If the reason for the moisture is that your ears are clogged with excessive earwax, ear drops will not be effective. Also, if you have a synthetic ear tubes or a ruptured ear drum never use ear drops.

Healthy skin creates a healthy ear environment. The best way to contribute to ear health and prevent infection in and around your ears is healthy skin. If the skin in your ears is dry or cracked, infection may result. For flaky dry skin in or around your ears, try these tips:

  • Don’t scratch or cut your ears
  • Keep your ears dry
  • Never use Q-tips or poke other objects in the ear.                   
  • Be gentle with cleaning. If you have excessive ear wax, see a doctor for cleaning.

You can minimize your risk of any infection (including Swimmer’s Ear) by remembering these preventative tips. Regular check-ups with your audiologist is important for maintaining ear health.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com

WHAT ARE THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF HEARING LOSS?

Hearing loss is an annoyance and can hinder a person’s social life and even effect productivity at work, but did you know that there can be other health implications associated with hearing loss?

Young Children and Babies with Hearing Loss

Hearing damage in infants and young children can be the most influential in a person’s life because it can hinder development during crucial years of growth. Inability to hear (or hear well) during these formative years can also go undetected until much of the damage has already been done.

Infants now undergo routine hearing screening soon after birth and at certain milestones to ensure their language, learning and social development is not hindered unnecessarily.

If hearing loss is not detected as early as possible, a child may miss key learning and communication development milestones that can affect his or her self-esteem, language skills and lifelong communication abilities.

Adults with Hearing Loss

The more common hearing loss occurs well into adulthood, as we age. This hearing loss won’t affect our development, but could lead to further health complications, including mental and social health issues.

Immediate effects of hearing loss can include headaches, fatigue, mental strain, muscle tension, high blood pressure and increased stress.

The effort it takes to communicate well when hearing is harder than it used to be can lead to social isolation and depression. Eventually lower mental stimulation may result which can lead to cognitive decline such as dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Hearing Loss as a Symptom

Hearing loss can not only cause other medical and health issues, it can also be a result of other health problems that may or may not have been yet detected.

These health problems that can affect hearing loss include heart disease, high blood pressure, high blood sugar, obesity, diabetes, and other chronic illness. Acute illnesses such as respiratory or ear infections can also affect hearing in the short term.

Medications can also cause short-term hearing loss as well, but will usually reverse when the medication is stopped. Medications that affect hearing are called ototoxic medications.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

San Mateo

88 N. San Mateo Drive
San Mateo, California, 94401

San Carlos

1008 Laurel Street
San Carlos, California, 94070

Phone: (650) 342-9449
Fax: (650) 342-4435
Email: info@calhearing.com