Encouraging a Loved One to Take a Hearing Test

Do you have a loved one who might benefit from hearing loss treatment? They ask you to repeat yourself over and over, or they don’t but then it’s clear they haven’t been listening while you spoke. Whenever you see them, the TV or the radio is on too loud. Maybe you notice them participating less in group conversations, or not wanting to get together in groups at all. Maybe they don’t admit they’re having trouble hearing, or maybe they know they have hearing loss but think they’re “doing just fine” without hearing aids.

To be sure, this is a frustrating situation. It’s clear to you that they’d be better off with hearing aids, but they have excuses like they don’t want to feel “old,” or they had a friend who didn’t like their hearing aids, or they remember the massive, whistling hearing aids of a parent or grandparent. With a little finesse, you may be able to help them see just how much better off they would be if they would suck it up and get a hearing test.

 

Do Some Research Beforehand

Luckily, these days the internet is full of information about studies regarding hearing loss and hearing aids. A few searches will give you a plethora of information that might help you demonstrate to your loved one just how much hearing aids can improve their life. Did you know over 90% of people who get hearing aids now are satisfied with them?

Those bulky old hearing aids from decades past are gone, with newer models that are smaller and smarter. Rather than just making everything louder, they can help distinguish speech from background noise, help alleviate tinnitus (ringing in the ears), and even integrate with modern technology via Bluetooth or other means at home, in the car, and even at museums and some restaurants.

Study after study indicates that hearing aids help with improving relationships, keep people feeling and acting younger, and even improve balance and reduce the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Bring a few of these statistics to your loved one’s attention gently and without judgment, and they might start to see their way clear to a hearing test.

 

Pick the Right Setting

Bring up the subject with a minimum of distractions, especially auditory distractions. If you’re at home, make sure the TV is off and you’re away from loud appliances. If you’re going out, pick a quiet place that’s well lit. Make sure you’re sitting facing each other. Raising your voice, even when it’s clear that it’s just so you can be heard better, still carries overtones of aggression, so you want to be able to stay and sound calm. If their hearing is in significant decline, they are likely at the point of using lip reading to assist their understanding of speech, so make sure they can see your face and you shouldn’t need to yell to be understood.

 

Mention Your Experiences

Point to specific experiences you’ve had with them when you know their hearing made things more difficult for them or for you, but don’t get emotional or accusatory. They can’t help that their hearing ability is declining, and they are likely scared about it. You don’t want them to dig in their heels, but to open up to the idea that hearing aids might be good for them. Let them know how their own experience would have been improved if they could hear better, and remind them that you want what is best for them.

 

Listen

Give them space to talk about their own experience of hearing loss. Encourage them to talk about their misgivings, their fears, and their frustrations. Don’t interrupt. Let them talk through their ideas; articulating things that we’ve only carried in our heads can be a transformative experience in itself, so give them space to change their own mind about things. If they feel the need to blame you for anything at this time, don’t get defensive but let them work through these thoughts and feelings on their own.

 

Remind Them of Your Support

Whether it’s a ride to the hearing test or just accompaniment for emotional support, let them know you’ll be there for them as they move forward. The process doesn’t have to be frustrating or frightening, especially when they know they’re not doing it alone.

The Benefits of Treating Hearing Loss

If you’re one of the 35 million Americans suffering from hearing loss, chances are you’re one of 70% of them who is not yet wearing hearing aids. On average, it takes a person 7 years from the time they realize they have hearing loss to the time they seek treatment for it. Some people think hearing aids will make them “old,” or that they’re getting by just fine without them. In fact, hearing aids help keep us feeling and acting young, and refusing them can have negative effects we might not imagine.

 

Why Seek Treatment for Hearing Loss?

If you’re suffering the early stages of hearing loss, you might be aware of getting fatigued earlier in social situations, or maybe you pretend to hear people to keep conversations moving forward. As these trends continue, they get worse, not better.

Study after study shows that untreated hearing loss leads to stressed relationships with partners, friends and loved ones; social isolation; less pay at work; increased risk of falling down and the associated bodily harm; and even brain atrophy and earlier onset of dementia.

However, there is good news! Getting hearing aids sooner rather than later keeps us healthier and happier. Here are a few of the benefits people notice about their hearing aids.

 

Increased Earning Power

The Better Hearing Institute conducted research that shows people who have untreated hearing loss make as much as $30,000 less per year than those who treat their hearing loss. Hearing aids overwhelmingly helped people’s annual raises stay on pace with those of people with normal hearing. Those with mild hearing loss are 90% less likely to suffer decreased earnings when they get hearing aids. For those with moderate-to-severe hearing loss, getting hearing aids improved earnings 77% of the time.

 

Better Mental Faculties

With untreated hearing loss, it appears that the parts of the brain that interpret sound begin to atrophy, as they have less sound to interpret. This ultimately makes understanding speech more difficult, even after hearing aids come into use. What’s more, studies have linked untreated hearing loss to earlier onset of dementia and cognitive decline. It makes sense, doesn’t it? When we stop taking in new information (not necessarily “facts,” but the constant inflow of sights and sounds from the world around us) our brains have less to process, and they can more quickly “lose their edge.” Hearing aids help keep auditory information coming in, keeping the brain active.

 

Decreased Tinnitus

Tinnitus, that annoying ringing in the ears, is usually comorbid with hearing loss, especially noise-induced hearing loss. Many modern hearing aids have features that allow them to be tuned to help alleviate tinnitus, but even hearing aids that are not specifically designed to address tinnitus help reduce the annoyance of it. While the tinnitus stays the same “volume,” the sounds from outside get louder, reducing the impact tinnitus has on perception.

 

Improved Social Relationships

It may seem obvious, but when we improve our hearing, we improve our channels of communication with those closest to us. People who wear hearing aids report marked improvement in their relationships – with not just better communication, but increased intimacy, fewer arguments, and more activities.

 

Increased Life Satisfaction

People who get hearing aids are almost unanimously in favor of them. In a Better Hearing Institute survey, 91% of respondents reported satisfaction with their hearing aids, and almost 90% would recommend them to a friend who had hearing loss. This is not just because the hearing aids work well, but because life improves as a result of them.

Imagine all the benefits that hearing aids can have when we open ourselves back up to serendipity and all that life could ever throw our way. Sometimes we forget to imagine what’s possible, but if we stay open to the energy around us, things happen and life continues to unfold in interesting ways. Hearing aids help us keep living life!

Identifying the Signs of Hearing Loss

With about 35 million Americans suffering some form of hearing loss, it is likely that you or someone you know may experience hearing loss. Unfortunately, about two-thirds of people with hearing loss live without the benefits of treatment in the form of hearing aids.

On average, it takes seven years for a person to get hearing aids, once they notice they’re suffering from hearing loss. The thing about hearing loss is that it isn’t always obvious to the person suffering it, especially if it is symmetrical between the ears. When our vision is blurry, we know it. We see it everywhere we look! By contrast, it’s harder to know what aspects of the sonic landscape we’re missing out on when our hearing ability declines.

We might hear voices and think we’re hearing all there is to them. We might think people are mumbling, when in fact we could be missing some crucial high-frequency information. Sounds might be happening all around us that we don’t notice. Unless our hearing loss has come on very suddenly, we likely will not notice it happening until it is very advanced.

So how do we know it’s time to get our hearing tested and see if hearing aids would be recommended for us? Well, it’s a great idea to get a hearing test whether you know you need one or not, but there are some clues we can tune into that might indicate we could benefit from hearing loss treatment.

 

Signs of Hearing Loss

There are lots of cues to think about when trying to assess whether you might have a hearing loss. Let’s break them down by three broad types and take a look.

 

1- Conversational

We can think of a conversational cue to hearing loss as anything that involves real-time communication and speech recognition.

  • Do you ask people to repeat themselves, and sometimes still have difficulty making out what they’re saying on the second or third time?
  • What about talking in groups? If you have difficulty following a conversation in a group of people, it could be a sign of hearing loss.
  • If you think people are mumbling all the time, it could be that you’re not taking in the higher frequencies of their speech.
  • Do you spend time with small children? If you have trouble hearing their high-pitched voices, it could be a sign of hearing loss.
  • Do you find yourself pretending to hear in conversation? If we have to ask people to repeat themselves a few times, we are apt to give up and just start nodding in agreement to save the irritation of further interruptions. Missing out on the overall arc of someone’s story can definitely be a sign of hearing loss.

2- Technological

Here are a few things to pay attention to with the technology around you, to see if you might be suffering from hearing loss.

  • Do you frequently turn up the volume on the TV or the car radio? If you’re with someone else, do they ask you to turn them down? The mismatch in comfortable listening level might be indicative of hearing loss.
  • Have you slept through your alarm lately? Maybe you’re not hearing it! Hearing loss never sleeps.
  • Do you have trouble on the phone? Maybe you try to turn the phone up, and it won’t go any higher. Maximum phone volumes are set to be safe for consumers; if you need it louder, you’re likely suffering from hearing loss.
  • The last time you went to the movies, did you have a hard time understanding the dialogue? The actors probably did not mumble through the film… It is more likely that you have hearing loss.

3- Lifestyle Changes

As hearing loss progresses, we might find ourselves changing our habits away from things where hearing loss makes participation more difficult.

  • Have you discontinued a favored hobby?
  • Any social groups you’re a part of that you’re skipping out on lately?
  • Do you go to restaurants or bars less frequently?
  • Are you having trouble at work?
  • Spending less time with friends and family?

If you find yourself answering yes to these questions, hearing loss could be the cause. But there’s no need to speculate; schedule a hearing test and find out for sure whether you need hearing aids. Most of the problems outlined above can be solved or lessened with the use of hearing aids, so get a hearing test today!

HOW TO BEST COMMUNICATE WITH THE HEARING IMPAIRED

The holidays are here, and with them come parties, gatherings and meeting new people! When you meet someone with hearing loss with whom you don’t normally communicate, you may have trouble understanding what they are going through. Communication becomes a bit more challenging for all parties involved.

Even those who have hearing devices and work to exercise their communication skills may have a bit more trouble conversing at a gathering than others. Here are some things we can do to facilitate communication and put our loved ones and new friends at ease in their efforts to communicate with us.

These communication strategies may can help enable a positive exchange with sufferers of hearing loss.

 Always face them

People with hearing loss use your body language and sometimes lip reading to help them to understand everything you say. Staying very close to them and facing them when speaking will help them a great deal.

 Use their names

Having hearing loss means that communication and listening take more effort and focus than for others. Hearing loss sufferers block out background noises, so they may miss cues, like speech directed at them from across the room. Saying his or her name before starting a conversation is more likely to get their attention, which leads to less frustration on both sides.

 Let them see your face

If your face covered, like when you are eating or when your hands are over your mouth, can make them miss out on valuable cues. Even beards and mustaches can interfere with communication cues.

 Try not to repeat yourself

 If someone there is a breakdown in communication, it usually doesn’t help to repeat the same words over and over. Say it in a different way; this can facilitate better communication and understanding.

 Don’t yell! Enunciate

Shouting may distort your voice and make the problem worse. Instead of yelling, try to speak slowly and distinctly.

Decrease background noise

Anything loud or distracting in the background can make hearing a conversation more difficult. TV, radio, or even household appliances interfere and cause a problem with communication for those with hearing loss. Turn all the background noises off and close the windows if possible.

Talk into the “good ear”

If your conversation partner has better hearing in one ear than the other, try to sit on that side or direct your speech to that ear.  That way, they don’t have to put as much effort into understanding the conversation. This small thing can make a huge difference.

Hearing loss doesn’t always make sounds less loud; they may sound distorted

Even if you are doing everything right, your conversation could still be difficult. Be patient! They are probably even more frustrated and would love to hear like they used to. Kindness and compassion will go a long way even when communication fails.

Keep in mind these basic things and your holiday gatherings will be more enjoyable for everyone. Happy holidays!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

 

Hearing for the Holidays

The holiday season is here! If you have difficulty hearing, you may not be looking forward to holiday gatherings and parties as much as you used to. This time of year can bring up some anxiety for people who have hearing loss. You or your loved ones may worry about how well you can communicate during family gatherings, or you may fear being embarrassed when you don’t hear conversation correctly. Background noise and group situations require your constant attention, and this can be tiring and overwhelming.

It may be enough for you to want to opt out of holiday festivities altogether. But don’t miss out on all of the fun! There are a few simple things you can do to get the most out of your holidays, even if you have difficulty hearing.

Let the Host Know

Before the party even begins, let the host of the party know you find it harder to hear in group situations and in background noise. Let them know that you are a bit self-conscious and you just want them to be aware of your hearing issues. That way, they can help facilitate a better experience for you by giving you particular seats at the dinner table, for example.

Ask for Brighter Lights and Lowered Background Music

Holiday gatherings, particularly at night, may have low lights and background music that can make it difficult for you to hear or communicate. Suggest that the host brighten the atmosphere and turn down the music a bit. This will make communication easier for everyone at the party, not just for you.

Keep it Separated

If there are a few different things going on at the gathering, suggest they all be sectioned off into different areas of the space. For example, karaoke in one room, the meal or buffet in another room, dancing in another room, and games in a different room. This will keep the background noise to a minimum and help to preserve your sanity when trying to interact at the party.

Stay Engaged, and Take a Break When you Need It

Communication may be a bigger effort for you than it used to be, so if you feel overwhelmed or fatigued, don’t be afraid to separate yourself to a quiet place for a break. That way when you do engage with others you will feel refreshed and won’t get irritable.

Keep Communication in Mind

If you want to be included in the conversation, you need to be able to hear what is going on. Ask if you can be seated in the middle of the table instead of on the end (even though often the end is dedicated as a place of honor) so you can be included in the conversation.

If you keep communication in mind and involve your host, you will have a much better experience and don’t have to worry about going to gatherings this holiday season.

Schedule a Tune Up

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for your annual hearing evaluation and, if you wear hearing devices, to make sure they are working at their best. If your devices have older technology, this may be a good time to test drive something new. Ask us about trying a set of demos during the holidays. You might just be amazed at how well you can hear.

DIFFERENT WAYS TO TEST FOR HEARING LOSS

If you suspect you may have hearing loss, it is recommended that you be tested to confirm if you have hearing loss, and how advanced it is.

If you have never had a hearing evaluation done before, you may be wondering what is involved. There are several ways to test for hearing loss, so we will go through a brief overview of them here. Not to worry: all methods are quick, easy and painless!

Simple Audible Tests

A test that is quick and easy is the whisper test: your doctor may ask you to cover one ear and whisper near the other ear to determine if you have hearing in that ear. Though it is not incredibly accurate, it can give the doctor a good idea of where to begin with other tests.

Get a Physical Exam

Your general physician may offer a hearing screening as part of your health check-up. This evaluation may include a physical examination: looking in your ear for inflammation, excessive ear wax or even structural problems that can lead to hearing loss.

Tuning Forks

Tuning forks are metal forks that produce a tune when they are hit together. Doctors can use tuning forks to do a quick test of hearing loss overall and where the damage has occurred.

Audiometer

An audiologist may also use an audiometer, which is a more accurate and thorough way to test hearing ability. During this test, you will be asked to wear headphones, with sounds isolated to one ear or the other. The sound will be repeated at different volume levels to test which you can hear.

Treatment for temporary hearing loss will depend on the source of the hearing loss. If you have a physical blockage, for example, like ear wax or a structural issue with your ear, the doctor may be able to remove or remedy it. For more severe structural issues surgery may help to correct the problem and restore normal hearing.

Cochlear implants may be another option if parts of the inner ear are not working correctly. Your doctor can explain this option, as well as its risks and benefits, if it is necessary for you.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

HYPERACUSIS: WHAT IS IT AND WHAT CAN I DO?

Hyperacusis is a condition in which a person has a heightened sensitivity to noises within the normal range of volume and pitch. It can get to the point that certain normal noises (like a dog barking or music over a loudspeaker) can even cause pain.

As you can imagine, this can make it very difficult for an affected person to live a normal life: limiting activities and events.

Hyperacusis can progress from tinnitus or a sense of discomfort in one or both ears. As it develops, the sufferer becomes more and more sensitive to ambient sounds and background noise.

Because of their intolerance for noise, hyperacusis sufferers may become isolated, depressed, or angry. They may also show signs of being anxious, like mood swings, sweating and a pounding heart.

What Causes Hyperacusis?

No one yet knows for sure what causes hyperacusis, but it has been found to be highly correlated with tinnitus—in fact, about 50% of people who suffer from tinnitus progress to some level of hyperacusis. However, not everyone who develops hyperacusis ever had tinnitus. There are other possible links to birth defects, auto-immune disorders or autism, which have not been confirmed.

The most commonly-believed cause of hyperacusis is physical trauma, such as a sports injury, car accident or any other shock to the nervous system.

How Can Hyperacusis be Treated?

Though hyperacusis does not yet have a cure, there are a range of treatment options that can make it manageable.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) help patients to engage with the ways they experience noise and pain, go through sound therapy, and help them to avoid stressful situations.

Noise Desensitization is another option when Cognitive Behavioral Therapy does not produce the desired results. Noise desensitization utilizes noise generators in controlled environment that help to change the way people perceive noise.

Patients may also have sessions in which they deal with the depression and distress that noise sensitivity can cause. These sessions may include relaxation techniques and counseling. These sessions can teach them how to manage the sensitivities and their response to it so they can avoid social isolation.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

BALANCE AND HEARING HEALTH

Did you know the way your body balances is connected with hearing health?

Balance disorders such as Vertigo are fairly common. Vertigo is typically temporary episode of imbalance or dizziness. Most people have heard that it is related to your inner ear, but do you know how?

Our bodies are oriented and balanced through the vestibular system, which allows us to stay upright without falling. Our inner ears and our eyes are sensory systems that support the body’s equilibrium and orientation. They translate and connect what is going on around us with our brains.  

The fluids in our inner ears are affected by hearing loss and also by sicknesses such as upper respiratory infections. These fluids control our sense of balance. This is why balance issues can result from hearing loss.

Balance issues can cause all kinds of problems, from increasing the risk of injury from falling, to embarrassment in public.

So how can you decrease your risk of vertigo and other balance problems?

1.    Pay attention to how your medications make you feel. If you always feel dizzy or very lethargic when taking a certain medication, talk to you doctor about other options.

2.    Get annual hearing exams. This is the best way to measure any hearing loss that has already occurred and make a plan to prevent further damage.

3.    If you need hearing aids, get them! They are an investment into not only your hearing, but your balance, your social life and your enjoyment of entertainment!

4.    Move every day. Daily exercise, such as regular walks or going to the gym are so important! Not only will these activities increase circulation and improve balance, it helps to regulate other bodily fluids like inner ear fluid too.

5.    Check your eyes too. When you get your yearly check-up, get a vision check. Poor vision can also increase the risk of balance issues.

Every part of our bodies are connected, and each part influences the others. Your overall health is impacted by your hearing health, so take care of it!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

THE CONNECTION BETWEEN HEARING LOSS AND EAR INFECTIONS

If your child has had ear infections, you understand how frightening they are. Intense pain along with concern for permanent hearing loss.

Hearing damage can be the result of an ear infection, but it is uncommon: ear infection-related hearing loss will almost always go away when the infection does.

Ear infections are not all the same, and can have different causes. While all ear infections can cause temporary hearing loss, the type of infection most associated with hearing loss is a middle ear infection.

Swimmer’s Ear is a type of outer ear infection that is most often caused by water getting trapped in the ear canal. This can give you the feeling that your head is in a box and cause sounds to be distorted or muted. Removing the fluid will usually resolve this type of ear infection quickly. Tilt your head or lay down on the affected side will often allow the water to run out on its own. Over-the-counter swimmer’s ear drops are also available at drug stores, and will also help to remove the moisture quickly and easily.  

Acute otitis media is a middle ear infection. These infections are painful and include ear canal inflammation. Fluid can sometimes build up behind the eardrum and result in temporary hearing loss on the affected side. This is a physical hearing loss, because the pent-up fluid is simply blocking the sound from entering the eardrum.  

Middle ear infections are commonly treated full hearing is reestablished after the infection is healed.

The Causes of Middle Ear Infections

Upper respiratory infections such as the common cold can prompt a middle ear infection. There is then inflammation and swelling in the Eustachian tube (which connects the middle ear with the throat). When there is inflammation in the Eustachian tube, it can’t balance pressure in the middle ear, and pain along with temporary hearing loss result.

Why Don’t Adults Get Ear Infections and Children Do?

Middle ear infections are more common in children than adults because children’s Eustachian tubes are less developed, making it more difficult for excess fluid to drain during an infection. A less-developed immune system in children can also contribute to the increased frequency of all kinds of infection.  

Ear Infection Symptoms

Small children and infants cannot express clearly the type of pain they are experiencing, or the exact location of pain. Here are some ways to recognize if your child has an ear infection:

  • Not responding to sounds or voices
  • Pulling at their ears
  • Fluids draining from the ear
  • An elevated temperature
  • Crankiness

Even in adults and older children an ear infection may be difficult to recognize. Here are some symptoms:

  • Ear pressure
  • A muted or blocked feeling, causing difficulty understanding speech
  • Feeling dizzy or off-balance
  • Pain in or around the ear
  • Vomiting or nausea

If your child gets recurring ear infections, it is possible for permanent hearing loss to occur. Visit your audiologist to weight the options.  

Ear Infection Treatment

Ear infections usually resolve themselves within a few days. Keep your child or yourself comfortable and treat with liquids and rest.

Check your child’s hearing often to catch any hearing loss as early you can, because permanent hearing loss is irreversible. To schedule an appointment for a quick, easy hearing evaluation, contact us today!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your budget.

DO I HAVE TINNITUS?

Have you ever heard a ringing in your ears? If so, you have experienced tinnitus. Tinnitus can be annoying, inconvenient, or even painful for the many people who suffer from it. Interestingly, some people never really notice symptoms of tinnitus, even though they are experiencing it. Recent research indicates that people have varying experiences of tinnitus, and these symptoms originate in the brain, not the ears.

A study done at the University of Illinois found that the brains of people with tinnitus hear sounds differently than those who don’t have tinnitus. Even among tinnitus sufferers, there are differences the way peoples’ brains process sound.

What Exactly is Tinnitus?

Tinnitus is actually just a symptom (not a disorder or disease). There are a lot of different causes of tinnitus, like noise exposure or use of ototoxic medications (medications that cause hearing loss). Approximately 25 million people across America are affected by tinnitus. There is no cure for tinnitus, and it is often temporary. It’s important to understand how to manage it and lessen its effects, or if possible, prevent it entirely.

Tinnitus Can be Affected by Your Feelings

Recent studies have found that the brain’s blood oxygen levels can change when exposed to different types of noise. Researchers discovered differences in the way tinnitus sufferer’s brains processed sound compared with non-tinnitus sufferers. “Good” sounds, like laughter, were presented, along with “neutral” and “unpleasant” sounds.

The Brain and Emotions

People with tinnitus engage with sounds differently in their brains, which can trigger emotion. Not so with people without tinnitus. The study also found that tinnitus sufferers who complain the most process emotional noise in different parts of the brain than the people who did not think the symptoms were bothersome.

This can explain why some people are very bothered by tinnitus, and others are not. This shows that the symptoms distress some people more than others.

Insomnia. irritability, depression, mood swings, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts have been reportedly caused by tinnitus. Some people merely report it as a minor irritant or even say it doesn’t trouble them at all. The people who are less bothered by tinnitus generally process emotion in the brain’s frontal lobe, while others process emotions in the brain’s amygdala.

Treatment Options for Tinnitus

This study helps explain why tinnitus is more bothersome to some people and not others. It may also help scientists to come up with more effective treatments that can target the cause of this suffering.

Hearing loss and tinnitus are often connected, but even people with normal hearing can have tinnitus. If you begin to experience tinnitus symptoms a trip to your audiologist is a good idea, and may help to prevent hearing loss. Hearing technology with sound therapy tools are shown to help ease the symptoms of tinnitus and hearing aids can also be an option for those who suffer from hearing loss and tinnitus.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening. We can discuss hearing aid options with you and work with you to find one that fits your needs and budget.