SUMMER TRAVEL TIPS FOR HEARING AIDS

Summer travel is a great and see new places and take a break from work or everyday life. Traveling may seem a bit more complicated if you have hearing loss, however, so here are some tips to make traveling the relaxing venture it was meant to be.

Hearing Loss and Traveling

When you have hearing loss, problems can arise while traveling. When you are in an unfamiliar environment, you may not recognize sounds such as warnings like smoke alarms, you may miss announcements at the airport or other locations, or hotel room telephones.

You may not have access to other usual conveniences such as accommodation for hearing dogs or sign language interpreters.

Planning Your Travel

Many of these issues can be sidestepped with proper planning, and you can relax and enjoy your vacation.

Here are some tips to simplify your travel:

  • If you are arranging your travel with a travel agent, see if it’s possible to plan your your trip in person to guarantee thorough communication and adequate planning for your whole trip. Most agents will be happy to contact airlines, hotels and other destinations to make reservations and accommodations.
  • Try to make as many travel arrangements in advance as possible and be sure to get a hard copy of the confirmation so you can check that everything is accurate. Also let someone at each destination know that you have a hearing issue, so they can make accommodations before your arrival.
  • We can access most of the resources we need on the internet: maps, confirmation numbers, reservations, and itineraries as well as other information to make sure your trip goes according to plan.
  • Always arrive early to the train station, airport, or bus terminal. Let a representative know you about your limitations so they can alert you to boarding calls and other relevant announcement.
  • Before boarding, always confirm your destination and flight number. Pay attention to the display board so you don’t miss changes in status or other information.
  • On airplanes, aisle seats may help you to more easily communicate with flight staff. Let them know you are hearing impaired when you board so they can communicate important messages.
  • Your fellow travelers can also be very helpful—all you have to do is ask– you may even make a new friend!

Traveling with Hearing Aids

If you use a hearing device, a little extra preparation will go a long way to make sure you don’t have unexpected issues during your travels.

  • You may want to bring a dehumidifier if you have one to prevent unanticipated moisture in other cliamtes.
  • While en route, try to carry your hearing aid equipment so you aren’t stuck without it if your luggage is lost temporarily.
  • Having extra tubing and batteries for your hearing aids can be a lifesaver if you need them and don’t have a place to buy them at your destination.

With foresight and preparation, you can have a great vacation!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

YOUR HEARING: WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW

We often take our hearing, and the sounds in our everyday world, for granted.

Stop for a moment and just listen. Hear the wind chimes from the neighbor or the humming of an air conditioner. The traffic a mile away or a dog barking.

From the time we are born, our hearing is mostly an automatic function. Our ears bring in the sound and our brains interpret it, as easily as breathing. In reality, even basic hearing is a complex and fascinating process. Here are a few things you may not know about how we hear.

Your Brain is in Control

Our ears bring sound in, but what happens after that? Just like our brains are vital to processing images that our eyes see, our brains are necessary for making sense of what sounds our ears hear. The outer ear funnels sound into the inner ear, which then translates the sound into electrical impulses along the auditory nerve. The brain receives these electrical impulses and interprets them to give them meaning to us.

One Ear is More Emotional than the Other One

If you have hearing loss, you may have noticed that one ear is worse than the other. In our bodies there is often a slight imbalance: one eye sees better than the other, one foot is slightly larger than the other. Did you know that your two ears also prefer different sounds?

Research has uncovered that the right and left ears don’t process sound in the same way. The left ear is typically more attuned to hearing music and emotion, while the right ear is more responsive to logic and speech. It is believed that this is the case because the right hemisphere of the brain processes music and other creative functions, while the left hemisphere of the brain processes speech.

This could also be the key to why people with hearing loss that is worse in the left ear sometimes have trouble understanding emotional issues expressed by their loved ones, and people who lose hearing more in their right ear begin to have difficulty with organization.

Your Listening Comprehension Depends on…Hair?

Did you know that your inner ear contains tiny hair cells that are vital to proper hearing and understanding the world around you?

The hair cells in the inner ear, known as stereocilia, accept sound vibrations that your ears collect and they transform those vibrations into electrical impulses that can be interpreted by the brain. You have about 16,000 of these tiny hair cells rolled up like a rug inside of your inner ear, and without them you can’t hear or understand the world around you. These hair cells don’t grow back once they die, and they can be damaged by loud noises and decreased blood flow when you are in poor health. So protect your hearing and your tiny ear hair cells by turning the music down and staying healthy!

Have You Noticed Hearing Loss Makes You Tired? You Are Not Alone

Since hearing has been an involuntary process for most of our lives, when our hearing becomes more difficult it also becomes more physically and emotionally draining. You are forced to concentrate harder to understand the world around you, so by the end of the day you may be exhausted.

The good news is that this can be remedied with today’s hearing aids. They assist your ears and your brain by helping you hear and understand your environment more clearly, so you don’t have to get so tired trying to hear things around you.

If you think that hearing loss may be influencing you and making you feel fatigued, come in for a hearing screening today and see how hearing devices may alleviate this burden.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

PROTECT YOUR HEARING AND STILL ENJOY CONCERTS!

With summertime comes fun in the sun and outdoors at concerts and picnics.  It’s the time for beach visits and laying out by the pool, park outings, and outdoor concerts when the day cools into evening. Festivals and concerts are a great change meet new friends, hear great music and hang out outside.

One thing that all concerts are is loud, however: often the noise levels are in more than 100 decibels! We know that hearing loss can happen at noise levels that are higher than 80 dB, it’s vital that we take precautions to guard our hearing. But that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy summer festivities!

Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Youth

An estimated 1.1 billion youth world-wide have been affected by noise-induced hearing damage. Energetic and adventurous, young people often gather in loud environments such as night clubs, sporting events and concerts, which often have very loud music or noise from crowds.

Even a short period of exposure to loud music can cause hearing damage, so it is important to find ways to protect your ears before going to these venues.

In one Amsterdam study in 2015, the effects on hearing of wearing earplugs or not wearing them was measured for outdoor concert-goers. 25 people wore earplugs to the concert and 26 people went without them. Of those, In the 4.5-hours concert, temporary hearing loss was measured in 22 of the 26 unprotected participants.

In contrast, only 4 people of the 25 wearing earplugs showed any hearing damage at all. Since repeated occurrences of temporary hearing loss can lead to permanent hearing loss, preventing even temporary hearing damage is crucial to long-term hearing health.

What Should I Do?

When worn during exposure to loud noises, earplugs can help to prevent noise-induced hearing loss. So next time you attend a sporting event, concert, or night club consider grabbing a pair of earplugs first.

Though this type of hearing loss is often temporary, remember that repeated exposure can have long-term effects and eventually become permanent damage. Sounds being muffled or difficulty hearing quiet sounds are some symptoms of hearing loss. If you experience any of these symptoms, please see your audiologist for a hearing screening to check on the level of damage and if anything can be done to prevent further hearing loss.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

COULD THE SEVERITY OF TINNITUS ORIGINATE IN THE BRAIN?

Ringing in the ears, also called tinnitus, can be a debilitating problem for the millions of people who suffer in the U.S. Some who are affected by tinnitus, however, do not suffer any major symptoms. Recent studies show that a person’s experience with tinnitus originates with the brain, not the ears.

One study from the University of Illinois found that sounds are processed differently in the brains of those with tinnitus than those without it. Even among people who have tinnitus, however, there are differences between how sound is processed in the brain.

Tinnitus is more a symptom than a disease in and of itself. Another trauma or condition may be the source of the symptom, which could stem from ototoxic medications or exposure to loud noise. It is important to understand more about the causes of tinnitus, because across America it is estimated that 25 million people are affected by it. Since there is no cure but only treatments that manage symptoms, understanding how to avoid or lessen its effects will prove useful for sufferers of tinnitus.

How Emotional Sounds Affect Tinnitus

Researchers have pinpointed changes in blood oxygen levels in the brain when exposed to different types of sounds. First they looked at the differences in sound processing between people with tinnitus compared to those without it. Sounds were introduced that were considered “pleasant” (children giggling), “unpleasant” (a baby crying) or “neutral” (a bottle being opened).

Areas of the Brain and Emotions

The study found brain engagement in different areas of the brain for emotion-triggering sounds for people with tinnitus than those without. They then took the study a step further and found that people who experience worse symptoms of tinnitus processed emotional sounds in different parts of the brain than those that described their symptoms as less severe.

This helps explain why some sufferers of tinnitus describe their symptoms as very severe and others say it doesn’t bother them at all. It shows that the severity of tinnitus can vary greatly from one person to the next because the level of distress caused by the symptoms varies.

Some people say tinnitus doesn’t affect their lives, and others report consequences such as irritability, mood swings, insomnia, anxiety, depression and even suicidal thoughts. The study showed that people who report less severe symptoms processed emotions primarily through the frontal lobe of the brain, while others processed emotions primarily in the amygdala portion of the brain.

Creating Treatment Options for Tinnitus

This research can help us to better understand why tinnitus causes more distress in some people than in others, and may lead to more effective treatment and therapy that can target the source of the distress.

Since hearing loss and tinnitus are often connected, visiting your audiologist when you begin to experience tinnitus symptoms may also help you to delay or prevent hearing damage. Sufferers of both tinnitus and hearing loss often find that hearing aids can also alleviate both issues. 

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

PROTECT YOUR HEART AND PRESERVE HEARING

Many things come to mind when you think of your heart: emotions, desires and dreams, the soul.You may also think of the physical organ that pumps blood through your body and sustains your life.

Heart health is an important part of overall health. The Center of Disease Control (CDC) reported that 600,000 people die from heart disease yearly in the U.S. The leading cause of death for both men and women, heart disease is a major health concern, and coronary heart disease is the most common type.

The media tells us these facts regularly, but did you know that hearing health is related to heart health? It then follows that protecting heart health also serves to protect hearing health!

Heart and Hearing Health

 Smoking

Everyone knows that smoking is bad for health. The chemicals in cigarette smoke damage blood cells and every organ in the body. One in five deaths results from in some way from smoking in the US. Smoking also causes plaque to develop in arteries. The arteries then harden and the blood pathways become narrow, causing stress to the heart.

Hearing is also affected by the chemicals present in cigarettes. The auditory nerve’s neurotransmitters can become blocked, which confuses your brain when it hears sound. As a result vertigo, tinnitus and dizziness may occur.

Hypertension

High blood pressure of 140/90 or higher can stretch your arteries, resulting in vascular weakness and scarring. Plaque and blood clots that clogs arteries may follow.

Constant blood flow is vital to the inner ear hair cells that help our brains to translate sounds into meaning. Blood pressure medications may also cause hearing damage. Some people develop ringing in the ears (tinnitus) from these medications.

Diabetes

Millions of Americans are affected by high blood sugar, and adult onset (type 2) diabetes is the most common. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can burden the heart and other organs by affecting blood flow.

Diabetes can also restrict the blood flow to the inner ear as a result of this decreased blood flow. The delicate hair cells of the inner ear can then die, and they can’t grow back. This makes hearing damage irreversible. Studies have shown that people with diabetes are twice as likely to suffer from hearing damage as those without it.

Sedentary Lifestyle

Modern Americans live sedentary lifestyles: many people sit in front of a computer at work during the day and then go home and sit in front of the TV before bedtime.

Exercise and eating real, unprocessed foods is the ideal method for heart disease prevention, as well as to prevent obesity.

If changing your diet and routine seems overwhelming, consider that even small tweaks can bring results. Swapping out your morning pastry for a protein-rich option like eggs, and your afternoon chicps for an apple, peanuts or a piece of cheese can cut down on carbs and keep your blood sugar levels in check. Take a walk around the block on your lunch break. Not only will you get some movement into your day, you’ll benefit from a change of scenery and fresh air.

Obesity

A majority of Americans are overweight. Obesity can stress your heart and increas the risk of heart disease, which in turn will increases the likelihood of heart failure in the future. Obesity are also often correlated with diabetes and high blood pressure, which bring more risk.

Alcoholism

If you drink one serving of alcohol with dinner, studies have shown that to be beneficial, alcohol consumption in excess can increase the risk of high blood pressure and can weaken your heart.

Drinking heavily produces free radicals that also affect the inner ear. Balance issues like vertigo, tinnitus and noise-induced hearing damage may result.

Remember these tips to protect your heart and your hearing:

  • Cut out processed foods and buy only fresh meats, fruits and vegetables
  • Get some exercise every day
  • Don’t smoke (or quit smoking)
  • Keep your weight at healthy levels
  • Drink no more than one serving of alcohol daily
  • Always get regular hearing screenings

Love your heart AND your hearing all year long!

Heart Healthy is Hearing Healthy!

Heart health and hearing health are connected, so we have to be aware of our overall health. Exercise at least a little every day (just a walk around the block will do!) and eat whole, unprocessed foods–these steps can make a big difference in overall health and also protect your hearing.

FREE Hearing Screening Celebrating Better Hearing Month

California Hearing Center invites you to come in for your Free Hearing Screening. When it comes to your hearing health, prevention is still the best medicine! No-obligation. Every Friday during the month for May 4, 11, 18 & 25 from 9:00 am – 3:00 pmAll ages welcome – No appointment necessary

Drop by at 88 N. San Mateo Dr. San Mateo, CA 94401  (650) 342-9449 www.calhearing.com

HOW DO MEDICATIONS AFFECT HEARING HEALTH?

Have you heard of ototoxicity?
Ototoxicity is a term used by health professionals for medications that can cause hearing loss. Both prescription and over-the-counter medications can be ototoxic.

Though these drugs may be effective for treating specific conditions and illnesses, they can also cause damage to delicate inner-ear hair cells and may affect balance and hearing.

Ototoxicity can affect people temporarily or permanently–so it is important to know how it is caused and how to prevent it or stop it.

Because drugs can accumulate in the body, the effects can be cumulative over time and get worse as the chemicals build up in the cells.

The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has found that there are currently more than two hundred medications and chemicals that can cause both balance disorders and hearing loss. If you are taking any of these types of drugs, speak with your physician about the implications for your hearing.

Pain Relievers

NSAID (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as acetaminophen, aspirin and other over-the-counter medicines can be effective to reduce inflammation and ease pain. Studies have shown, however, that regular use of these drugs can cause hearing loss. Even a daily aspirin recommended by your doctor may have hearing loss effects.

Diuretics

Diuretics are prescribed to alleviate many conditions, such as high blood pressure, glaucoma, edema and other issues. These medicines can also cause temporary tinnitus and hearing loss, however, though we don’t fully understand why.

Antibiotics

Antibiotics can be used as life-saving medicines, and are important for serious bacterial infections. One classification of antibiotics, aminogycosides, have hearing loss as a side effect. This type of antibiotic is often treated as a last-resort medication when other antibiotics do not work for serious infections.

Chemotherapy Drugs

A platinum-based chemotherapy called Cisplatin is frequently used to treat metastatic testicular, ovarian and bladder cancers. Side effects reported for this drug range from vertigo to tinnitus as well as permanent or temporary hearing loss. A strong correlation has been found between platinum-based chemotherapy treatments and hearing loss, and researchers are looking for ways to alleviate this side effect.

What Can You Do?

You may need to take one of these medications for a serious issue, so the risks and benefits must be weighed. It is important to understand the risks and side effects of medications (even over-the-counter medications) however, so you can recognize these risks if they appear.

Medications affect different people differently, so stay attuned to your hearing and if the medications you are taking are affecting you, and approach your physician with any concerns.

Often if a medication begins to cause issues with hearing or balance, stopping those symptoms can be as simple as not taking that medication. If pro-active steps are taken, permanent damage can often be avoided.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

WELCOME SPRING – PREPARE YOUR EARS!

Spring is in the air! The weather is changing and we are already starting to enjoy blooming flowers and warmer! With the changing of seasons, we also get rainy weather, seasonal allergies, and erratic temperatures. Along with hearing aids, these changes can affect us, but we can downplay those effects.

The Weather is Changing

With changing weather, some people have a feeling of fullness in their ears. Barometric pressure changes with changes in the weather and causes this sensation of fullness, and makes the fluid in the inner ear sensitive to the weather. Seasonal allergy sufferers can experience this even more intensely.

Meniere’s disease can make the irritating symptoms even worse in the Springtime. The chambers of the inner ear can bulge and the fluid may back up. Difficulty hearing and discomfort as well as vertigo or tinnitus may sometimes result from this build-up.

Seasonal Allergies

Sinus pressure and sneezing can also result from seasonal allergies and add pressure to the inner ear. Seasonal allergies affect 40 percent of children and between 10 and 30 percent of adults. Up to 60 million Americans experience sneezing, ear pressure, sinus pressure, and itchy, watery eyes. Each of these symptoms can affect hearing temporarily.

Ear pressure can be temporarily relieved with non-prescription medications such as antihistamines and decongestants. Moderate exercise and a sensible diet of whole foods often improve these symptoms. Vegetables and fruits, like bell peppers, grapes, asparagus, watermelon, and celery serve as diuretics and promote fluid drainage.

Spring-time and Hearing Aids

Warmer, wetter weather may also affect the functionality of your hearing aids. Your hearing aids’ maintenance and care of during this time of year may also require more attention. The microphone ports can sometimes get obstructed by matter such as bee pollen. Proper cleaning of your hearing aids is important, and be sure to replace the mic port covers when needed.

Moisture from the heat, rain and humidity of spring and summer can also be introduced to your hearing aids, building up in the tubing and causing static in the receiver or microphone. Ensuring your hearing aids stay dry when going out in wet or humid weather can prevent issues.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

WHAT ARE THE LINKS BETWEEN SMOKING AND HEARING LOSS?

If you smoke, you are well aware at this point of the dangers and risks associated with that habit. The media has no shortage of news stories about how smoking can increase the risk of respiratory problems, heart disease and cancer.

These risks are widely known to the 40 million American adults who smoke cigarettes, but did you know that smoking can also affect your hearing health?

Experts in the field of hearing health have long suspected that smoking can contribute to hearing damage, but on-going studies the past few decades has confirmed it. These same studies also show that second-hand smoke exposure also doubles your risk to develop hearing loss.

How does smoking affect hearing health?

It turns out there are several ways. An abundance of chemicals are found in cigarettes, from arsenic, formaldehyde, and nicotine to hydrogen cyanide.

The combination of carbon monoxide and nicotine work to deplete oxygen levels and tighten blood vessels throughout the body. The inner ear is very sensitive and dependent on the small blood vessels that circulate in them for maintaining hair cell health and hearing overall.

Chemicals that Affect Hearing.

Nicotine, the main addictive component of cigarettes, also has a number of harmful effects, including dizziness, vertigo and tinnitus and interfering with neurotransmitters in the auditory nerve, which regulate how your brain interprets sound.

Smoking in general causes damage to every cell in the body with free radicals that cause disease and damage DNA. Smoking can also irritate the lining of the middle ear and make you more sensitive to loud noise. This can in turn increase your risk of developing noise-induced hearing loss.

Studies have shown that the longer you smoke, the worse for your hearing health, but the good news is that as soon as you stop smoking you can start to see the benefits of quitting. As soon as 20 minutes after your last smoke, circulation improves and blood pressure is decreased. Eight hours later, oxygen and carbon monoxide levels normalize and in 48 hours your senses of taste and smell return to more normal levels.

Quitting smoking has numerous benefits for your whole body, including lowering your risk of heard disease, vascular disease and stroke as well as several types of cancer. Not smoking can also increase fertility and reduce risk of many other diseases.

Stop the damage now.

Since you can’t reverse hearing damage that has already happened, it is beneficial to quit smoking before the damage occurs, or gets worse. If you are ready to quit smoking, visit smokefree.gov for tips and ways to get through your first few days without cigarettes.

No matter what the cause, if you suspect you have hearing loss it is best to visit your audiologist right away to take the best course of action. Your audiologist may offer a solution that can slow or halt the progression of hearing loss.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

DO YOU KNOW THE LESS COMMON CAUSES OF HEARING LOSS?

You probably know the most common causes of hearing loss: quick exposure to extreme noise, like a gunshot near your ear or an explosion; or long-term exposure to noise above 80 decibels, such as ongoing proximity to factory machinery, lawnmowers or loud music.

There are some other not-so-common causes of hearing damage that you may be unfamiliar with. If you are experiencing hearing loss and have not had exposure to loud noise, you may have one of these less common causes.

Diplacusis is a phenomenon where people experience “double hearing,” similar to “double vision.” There is a shift in pitch perception and this can cause them to hear one sound as two sounds. Often this can occur with people who have hearing impairment in only one ear, with normal hearing in the other ear. People with conductive hearing loss can sometimes experience diplacusis temporarily. Musicians are most likely to notice this phenomenon.

Otitis Media is also known as an ear infection. Ear infections can result from a cold and can interfere with hearing. Seventy-five percent of children have experience otitis media at least once by the age of three, but it can affect people of any age.

Usher syndrome is believed to be responsible for three to six percent of all childhood deafness and up to 50% of blindness and deafness in adults. Usher syndrome is inherited, and the symptoms include deafness or hearing loss, issues with balance, and retinitis pigmetosa, a vision disorder. Children born with type 1 Usher syndrome are born deaf, while those with type 2 are born with some hearing damage and those with type 3 are born with normal hearing but suffer with progressive hearing and vision loss that may affect them as teenagers or young adults.

Meniere’s Disease is a chronic inner ear condition affecting hearing and balance. If you think you have vertigo but it does not go away, you may be suffering from Meniere’s Disease. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance of inner ear fluid, and may be caused by things such as allergies, head trauma, viral infections, migraines, or the inability of the ear to drain properly. Meniere’s Disease may also be hereditary.

Acoustic Neuroma is a rare condition, affecting approximately two in every 100,000 people. It is a slow-growing and benign brain tumor that develops in the cranial nerve connecting the brain to the ear. The symptoms may include loss of hearing in one ear, tinnitus (ringing in the ear), vertigo (dizziness) and balance issues.

No matter what the cause, if you suspect you have hearing loss it is best to visit your audiologist right away to take the best course of action. Your audiologist may offer a solution that can slow or halt the progression of hearing loss.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

RETIREMENT AND (HEARING) HEALTHCARE

If you plan to retire soon, it’s time to think about expenses and how everything will be covered. Healthcare costs, including hearing healthcare, should be factored in. Estimates from HealthView Insights show that an American couple retiring this year can expect just over $400,000 in healthcare costs over the course of retirement, with about 4% of that being out of pocket (and most of it covered by insurance or Medicare).

These numbers are estimates and averages, so actual expenses can vary with gender, age and location. What we can be sure of is that medical expenses will probably make up a significant amount of your total budget. Housing or mortgage costs will probably be the biggest expense, with healthcare costs coming in second. If you are using Medicare, there are a lot of out-of-pocket expenses that are not covered, including hearing aids.

Being Prepared Before You Retire

There are a few things you can do to prepare and save for retirement medical expenses while you are still working. For example, if you have a Flexible Spending Account (FSA) set up while you are still working, before-tax dollars can be used on all of your medical expenses for that year, and you can buy things that aren’t going to be covered when you are retired (like those hearing aids!). Sometimes employers contribute to FSA accounts as well, beefing up the total amount of money you have to spend on such medical expenses, and saving you out-of-pocket costs.

Even if you are not working, make things easier by portioning out money in a separate account for medical expenses so you have easy access when you need it. HealthView has estimated that the average American couple at age 65 will incur about $950 in medical expenses per month, and this number will increase with age.

Keep Yourself Healthy!

It goes without saying the better your health is, the less medical expenses you should expect to pay. Adopting healthy habits is a good rule of preventative care at any age, but can significantly reduce costs during retirement.

Not smoking, losing weight, eating right and exercising regularly are all obvious ways to improve overall health, and they also improve hearing health and reduce the risk of hearing damage.

Get moving! Blood circulation increases with regular movement, even if it’s just a walk around the block once or twice per day. Every organ in your body benefits from better blood circulation, including your ears! The delicate hair cells in your inner ear, which help to translate sound for your brain, are dependent on proper circulation for healthy function–so get that heart pumping!

We all look forward to retirement to enjoy more activities that we love–and some of those are noisy! Be sure to wear adequate hearing protection, such as ear plugs, when you are in a noisy environment, like at a concert, fireworks or in the proximity of machinery like an electric saw or lawnmower.

Hearing Health is Important!

Many Americans over 65 suffer from some degree of hearing loss, which can typically be treated easily with hearing aids. Regular screenings are key to measuring the severity of any existing hearing loss and stopping it in its tracks.

Not treating hearing loss can cost you much more than catching it early and doing something about it. If left untreated, hearing loss can worsen, causing bigger problems down the road such as dementia, anxiety and depression.

There’s good news! An annual hearing screening is painless and easy, and can save you a lot of trouble down the road!

Make a commitment today to improve your overall health by cleaning up your diet and being more active every day.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.