SUMMER TRAVEL TIPS FOR HEARING AIDS

Summer travel is a great and see new places and take a break from work or everyday life. Traveling may seem a bit more complicated if you have hearing loss, however, so here are some tips to make traveling the relaxing venture it was meant to be.

Hearing Loss and Traveling

When you have hearing loss, problems can arise while traveling. When you are in an unfamiliar environment, you may not recognize sounds such as warnings like smoke alarms, you may miss announcements at the airport or other locations, or hotel room telephones.

You may not have access to other usual conveniences such as accommodation for hearing dogs or sign language interpreters.

Planning Your Travel

Many of these issues can be sidestepped with proper planning, and you can relax and enjoy your vacation.

Here are some tips to simplify your travel:

  • If you are arranging your travel with a travel agent, see if it’s possible to plan your your trip in person to guarantee thorough communication and adequate planning for your whole trip. Most agents will be happy to contact airlines, hotels and other destinations to make reservations and accommodations.
  • Try to make as many travel arrangements in advance as possible and be sure to get a hard copy of the confirmation so you can check that everything is accurate. Also let someone at each destination know that you have a hearing issue, so they can make accommodations before your arrival.
  • We can access most of the resources we need on the internet: maps, confirmation numbers, reservations, and itineraries as well as other information to make sure your trip goes according to plan.
  • Always arrive early to the train station, airport, or bus terminal. Let a representative know you about your limitations so they can alert you to boarding calls and other relevant announcement.
  • Before boarding, always confirm your destination and flight number. Pay attention to the display board so you don’t miss changes in status or other information.
  • On airplanes, aisle seats may help you to more easily communicate with flight staff. Let them know you are hearing impaired when you board so they can communicate important messages.
  • Your fellow travelers can also be very helpful—all you have to do is ask– you may even make a new friend!

Traveling with Hearing Aids

If you use a hearing device, a little extra preparation will go a long way to make sure you don’t have unexpected issues during your travels.

  • You may want to bring a dehumidifier if you have one to prevent unanticipated moisture in other cliamtes.
  • While en route, try to carry your hearing aid equipment so you aren’t stuck without it if your luggage is lost temporarily.
  • Having extra tubing and batteries for your hearing aids can be a lifesaver if you need them and don’t have a place to buy them at your destination.

With foresight and preparation, you can have a great vacation!

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.

YOUR HEARING: WHAT YOU DON’T KNOW

We often take our hearing, and the sounds in our everyday world, for granted.

Stop for a moment and just listen. Hear the wind chimes from the neighbor or the humming of an air conditioner. The traffic a mile away or a dog barking.

From the time we are born, our hearing is mostly an automatic function. Our ears bring in the sound and our brains interpret it, as easily as breathing. In reality, even basic hearing is a complex and fascinating process. Here are a few things you may not know about how we hear.

Your Brain is in Control

Our ears bring sound in, but what happens after that? Just like our brains are vital to processing images that our eyes see, our brains are necessary for making sense of what sounds our ears hear. The outer ear funnels sound into the inner ear, which then translates the sound into electrical impulses along the auditory nerve. The brain receives these electrical impulses and interprets them to give them meaning to us.

One Ear is More Emotional than the Other One

If you have hearing loss, you may have noticed that one ear is worse than the other. In our bodies there is often a slight imbalance: one eye sees better than the other, one foot is slightly larger than the other. Did you know that your two ears also prefer different sounds?

Research has uncovered that the right and left ears don’t process sound in the same way. The left ear is typically more attuned to hearing music and emotion, while the right ear is more responsive to logic and speech. It is believed that this is the case because the right hemisphere of the brain processes music and other creative functions, while the left hemisphere of the brain processes speech.

This could also be the key to why people with hearing loss that is worse in the left ear sometimes have trouble understanding emotional issues expressed by their loved ones, and people who lose hearing more in their right ear begin to have difficulty with organization.

Your Listening Comprehension Depends on…Hair?

Did you know that your inner ear contains tiny hair cells that are vital to proper hearing and understanding the world around you?

The hair cells in the inner ear, known as stereocilia, accept sound vibrations that your ears collect and they transform those vibrations into electrical impulses that can be interpreted by the brain. You have about 16,000 of these tiny hair cells rolled up like a rug inside of your inner ear, and without them you can’t hear or understand the world around you. These hair cells don’t grow back once they die, and they can be damaged by loud noises and decreased blood flow when you are in poor health. So protect your hearing and your tiny ear hair cells by turning the music down and staying healthy!

Have You Noticed Hearing Loss Makes You Tired? You Are Not Alone

Since hearing has been an involuntary process for most of our lives, when our hearing becomes more difficult it also becomes more physically and emotionally draining. You are forced to concentrate harder to understand the world around you, so by the end of the day you may be exhausted.

The good news is that this can be remedied with today’s hearing aids. They assist your ears and your brain by helping you hear and understand your environment more clearly, so you don’t have to get so tired trying to hear things around you.

If you think that hearing loss may be influencing you and making you feel fatigued, come in for a hearing screening today and see how hearing devices may alleviate this burden.

Here at California Hearing Center we are committed to your hearing health. Call us today to set up an appointment for a hearing screening.